Tag Archives: Administration/Intravaginal

The insertion of drugs into the vagina to treat local infections, neoplasms, or to induce labor. The dosage forms may include medicated pessaries, irrigation fluids, and suppositories.

Female genital cutting and other intra-vaginal practices: implications for TwoDay Method use.

J Biosoc Sci. 2012 Sep;44(5):631-5.

Female genital cutting and other intra-vaginal practices: implications for TwoDay Method use.

Aksel S, Sinai I, Yee KA.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT

This report examines the implications of female genital cutting and other intra-vaginal practices for offering the TwoDay Method® of family planning.This fertility awareness-based method relies on the identification of cervicovaginal secretions to identify the fertile window. Female genital cutting and traditional vaginal practices, such as the use of desiccants, may affect the presence or absence of secretions and therefore the woman’s perception of her fertility. These issues and their implications for service delivery of the method are discussed.

There is no link to view this article online.

Intravaginal practices, bacterial vaginosis, and women’s susceptibility to HIV infection: epidemiological evidence and biological mechanisms.

Lancet Infect Dis. 2005 Dec;5(12):786-94.

Intravaginal practices, bacterial vaginosis, and women’s susceptibility to HIV infection: epidemiological evidence and biological mechanisms.

Myer L, Kuhn L, Stein ZA, Wright TC Jr, Denny L

Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. lmyer@cormack.uct.ac.za

ABSTRACT

Intravaginal practices such as “dry sex” and douching have been suggested as a risk factor that may increase women’s susceptibility to HIV infection. These behaviours appear common in different populations across sub-Saharan Africa, where practices include the use of antiseptic preparations, traditional medicines, or the insertion of fingers or cloths into the vagina. We systematically review the evidence for the association between women’s intravaginal practices and HIV infection. Although a number of cross-sectional studies have shown that prevalent HIV infection is more common among women reporting intravaginal practices, the temporal nature of this association is unclear. Current evidence suggests that bacterial vaginosis, which is a likely risk factor for HIV infection, may be a mediator of the association between intravaginal practices and HIV. Although biologically plausible mechanisms exist, there is currently little epidemiological evidence suggesting that intravaginal practices increase women’s susceptibility to HIV infection. Further research into factors that increase women’s susceptibility to HIV will help to inform the design of vaginal microbicides and other HIV prevention interventions.

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Traditional intravaginal practices and the heterosexual transmission of disease: a review.

Sex Transm Dis. 2000 Apr;27(4):183-7.

Traditional intravaginal practices and the heterosexual transmission of disease: a review.

Brown JE, Brown RC

Community Health Department Chogoria Hospital, Kenya.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To review reports on the use and effects of traditional intravaginal substances and practices.

METHOD: The medical and social science literature of the past 50 years regarding use and effects of traditional intravaginal substances and practices is reviewed.

RESULTS: Traditional intravaginal practices have been described in 11 countries of sub-Saharan Africa, and also in Qatar, Indonesia, Thailand, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and the United States. Women’s reasons for the practices include personal hygiene, disease prevention or treatment, and enhancement of sexual experience. Few studies document damage to the vaginal epithelium or changes in vaginal flora due to these practices. No prospective studies link these practices to disease transmission.

CONCLUSION: The determination of how these practices affect disease transmission will require precise definition of independent variables, which is difficult because of the diversity of the practices. It is appropriate to search for intervening variables; specifically, the effects on the vaginal pH, flora, and epithelium.

This article can be purchased in this LINK