Tag Archives: Australia

Australian midwives’ perspectives on managing obstetric care of women living with female genital circumcision/mutilation

Health Care Women Int. 2016 Jul 22:1-14. [Epub ahead of print]

Australian midwives’ perspectives on managing obstetric care of women living with female genital circumcision/mutilation

Ogunsiji O

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM) or female circumcision is a global health issue with increasing international migration of affected women and girls to countries unfamiliar with the practice. Western health care providers are unfamiliar with FGM, and managing obstetric care presents challenges to midwives who are in the forefront of care provision for the women. The participants in this Heideggerian qualitative interpretive study elucidated the strategies they used in overcoming the particular physical, emotional, and gynecological health issues with which mutilated women present. Ongoing emphases on women-centered, culturally competent maternity care are germane to optimal maternity care of circumcised women.

Health professionals worldwide lack knowledge on female genital mutilation

BMJ. 2015;351:h6693

Health professionals worldwide lack knowledge on female genital mutilation

Kmietowicz Z

EXTRACT

More training and guidance on treating women and girls who have had female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C) are needed for health professionals around the world, a review has concluded.

Researchers from Sydney, Australia, conducted a systematic review to assess health professionals’ experience of FGM/C in their clinical setting, their knowledge of FGM/C types, complications of the practice, and their access to education and training.

They found 159 research papers, but the standard was generally poor. Only 18 studies met their inclusion criteria, and none met all eight quality criteria. …

This article can be accessed in this LINK

 

Female genital mutilation/cutting – towards abandonment of a harmful cultural practice.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2014 May 6. doi: 10.1111/ajo.12206. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital mutilation/cutting – towards abandonment of a harmful cultural practice.

Varol N, Fraser IS, Ng CH, Jaldesa G, Hall J.

ABSTRACT

Globally, the prevalence of, and support for, female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is declining. However, the entrenched sense of social obligation that propagates the continuation of this practice and the lack of open communication between men and women on this sensitive issue are two important barriers to abandonment. There is limited evidence on the role of men and their experiences in FGM/C. Marriageability of girls is considered to be one of the main driving forces for the continuation of this practice. In some countries, more men than women are advocating to end FGM/C. Moreover, men, as partners to women with FGM/C, also report physical and psychosexual problems. The abandonment process involves expanding a range of successful programs, addressing the human rights priorities of communities and providing power over their own development processes. Anecdotal evidence exists that FGM/C is practised amongst African migrant populations in Australia. The Australian Government supports a taskforce to improve community awareness and education, workforce training and evidence building. Internationally, an African Coordinating Centre for abandonment of FGM/C has been established in Kenya with a major global support group to share research, promote solidarity, advocacy and implement a coordinated and integrated response to abandon FGM/C.

 

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Australia aims to eliminate female genital mutilation

BMJ. 2012 Dec 17;345:e8553. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e8553.FREE

Australia aims to eliminate female genital mutilation.

Sweet M.

EXTRACT

The Australian government has announced a suite of measures aimed at eliminating female genital mutilation, a practice that it has described as “barbaric” and “horrific.”

A joint statement by the prime minister, Julia Gillard, and the health minister, Tanya Plibersek, said that a national summit involving health, legal, and policing experts would be held early next year to raise awareness of the issue.1

The government also announced funding of $A0.5m (£0.3m; €0.4m; $US0.5m) for community awareness and education activities and said that new research and data collection on female genital mutilation would be a priority.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Health care of refugee women.

Aust Fam Physician. 2007 Mar;36(3):151-4.FREE

Health care of refugee women.

Costa D.

Womens Health Statewide, North Adelaide, Australia. danielac@chariot.net.au

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women refugees have endured major discrimination and poverty in their countries of origin or countries of displacement. This has had a major impact on their physical and psychological health. The experience of resettlement places a further burden on their health.

OBJECTIVE: This article aims to provide a simple approach to the health assessment and management of women refugees, taking into account specific issues related to migration and resettlement.

DISCUSSION: Because of the complexities of their realities related to gender, social and economic status, and premigration and resettlement experiences, women refugees need a multiplicity of health interventions. The identification of the major physical and psychological health issues with consideration of gender issues and premigration and resettlement experiences, represents more adequate basis for the assessment and management of the health care of women refugees.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation: origin, beliefs, prevalence and implications for health care workers caring for immigrant women in Australia.

Contemp Nurse. 2007 May-Jun;25(1-2):22-30.

Female genital mutilation: origin, beliefs, prevalence and implications for health care workers caring for immigrant women in Australia.

Ogunsiji OO, Wilkes L, Jackson D.

School of Nursing, University of Western Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT

The recent wave of immigrants to Australia includes people from countries where female genital mutilation (FGM) is predominant. FGM is the terminology used by the World Health Organisation to describe all procedures involving partial or total removal of female external genitalia. A review of the literature has found that FGM still exists and the influx of immigrants to Western countries such as Australia has seen more women in these countries with the physical and psychological after-effects of the procedure. Findings of this literature review highlight the need for heightened awareness of issues around FGM so as to better provide adequate physical and psychological support to women affected by FGM.

There is no LINK to view this article online

The experiences of African women giving birth in Brisbane, Australia.

Health Care Women Int. 2010 May;31(5):458-72. doi: 10.1080/07399330903548928.

The experiences of African women giving birth in Brisbane, Australia.

Murray L, Windsor C, Parker E, Tewfik O.

School of Public Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane, Australia. linda.murray@qut.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Our purpose in this research was to uncover first-person descriptions of the birth experiences of African refugee women in Brisbane, Australia, and to explore the common themes that emerged from their experiences. We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 African refugees who had given birth in Brisbane. Essences universal to childbirth such as pain, control, and experiences of caregivers featured prominently in participants’ descriptions of their experiences. Their experiences, however, were further overshadowed by issues such as language barriers, the refugee experience, female genital mutilation (FGM), and encounters with health services with limited cultural competence.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

New de-infibulation clinic for Royal Women’s in Melbourne.

Aust Nurs J. 2011 Apr;18(9):39.

New de-infibulation clinic for Royal Women’s in Melbourne.

Waters J.

Women’s Health Information Centre, Well Women’s Services, Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne.

No abstract is available for this article.

There is no LINK to view this article online.