Tag Archives: Body Modification/Non-Therapeutic

The wounding of the body or body parts by branding, cutting, piercing (BODY PIERCING), or TATTOOING as a cultural practice or expression of creativity or identity.

Labia reduction for non-therapeutic reasons vs. female genital mutilation: contradictions in law and practice in Britain.

Reprod Health Matters. 2010 May;18(35):106-10.

Labia reduction for non-therapeutic reasons vs. female genital mutilation: contradictions in law and practice in Britain.

Berer M.

Reproductive Health Matters, London, UK. mberer@rhmjournal.org.uk

“…In the 26 May 2007 edition of the British Medical Journal (BMJ), two British psychologists reported that the numbers of requests from women for surgery to alter the appearance of their genitals, especially the labia, were increasing.1 In examining this phenomenon, the authors asked: how should health care providers respond to requests for this surgery? From this and other literature on this subject, a picture emerges of a growing number of women, many of them very young, who have been led to believe something is wrong with their genitals. According…”

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Clinical characteristics of well women seeking labial reduction surgery: a prospective study

BJOG. 2011 Nov; 118(12): 1507-1510

Clinical characteristics of well women seeking labial reduction surgery: a prospective studyCrouch NS, Deans R, Michala L, Liao L-M, Creighton SM

ABSTRACT

Objective  To assess clinical characteristics and expectations in well women requesting elective labial reduction surgery.

Design  Prospective study of women attending an outpatient gynaecology clinic.

Setting  General gynaecology clinic at a Central London teaching hospital.

Sample  Women requesting labial reduction surgery and referred by their general practitioner.

Methods  The labia minora width and length were measured for all participants for comparison with published normal values. The presenting complaint was recorded, along with demographic details, expectations of surgery and sources of information regarding appearance of the labia.

Main outcome measures  Labial measurements, reported symptoms and expectations of surgery.

Results  The labia of all participants were within normal published limits, with a mean (SD) of 26.9 (12.8) mm (right labia), and 24.8 (13.1) mm (left labia). The majority of complaints were regarding appearance or discomfort. Expectations were to alter the appearance with surgery.

Conclusions  All women seeking surgery had normal-sized labia minora. Clear guidance is needed for clinicians on how best to care for the worried well woman seeking surgery.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Labial surgery for well women: a review of the literature

BJOG. 2010 Jan; 117(1): 20-25.

Labial surgery for well women: a review of the literature

Liao L-M, Michala L, Creighton SM

ABSTRACT

This review investigates the quality and content of published reports relating to labial surgery for well women. Electronic databases were searched for relevant articles between 1950 and April 2009. Forty articles were identified, 18 of which included patient data. The specification of the study design was unavailable in 15 of the 18 papers; the remaining three were retrospective reports. No prospective, randomised or controlled studies were found. All reports claimed high levels of patient satisfaction and contained anecdotes pertaining to success. Medically nonessential surgery to the labia minora is being promoted as an effective treatment for women’s complaints, but no data on clinical effectiveness exist.

This review can be accessed in this LINK

A relationship between female genital piercings and genital mutilation?

BJOG. 2012 June; 119(7): 895-896.

A relationship between female genital piercings and genital mutilation?

Nelius T, Armstrong ML, Angel E, Hogan L, Young C, Rinard K

ABSTRACT

No abstract is available for this article.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Should female genital cosmetic surgery and genital piercing be regarded ethically and legally as female genital mutilation?

BJOG 2012;119:389–392.

Should female genital cosmetic surgery and genital piercing be regarded ethically and legally as female genital mutilation?

Kelly B, Foster C.

Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Oxford University, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK. brenda.kelly@obs-gyn.ox.ac.uk

No abstract is available for this article.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Should we prevent non-therapeutic and extreme body modification?

Bioethics. 2008 Jan; 22(1):8-15

Should we prevent non-therapeutic and extreme body modification?

Schramme T

ABSTRACT

In this paper, I discuss several arguments against non-therapeutic mutilation. Interventions into bodily integrity, which do not serve a therapeutic purpose and are not regarded as aesthetically acceptable by the majority, e.g. tongue splitting, branding and flesh stapling, are now practised, but, however, are still seen as a kind of ‘aberration’ that ought not to be allowed. I reject several arguments for a possible ban on these body modifications. I find the common pathologisation of body modifications, Kant’s argument of duties to oneself and the objection from irrationality all wanting. In conclusion, I see no convincing support for prohibition of voluntary mutilations.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Male and female genital cutting among Southern Thailand’s Muslims: rituals, biomedical practice and local discourses

Cult Health Sex. 2010;12(7):725-738

Male and female genital cutting among Southern Thailand’s Muslims: rituals, biomedical practice and local discourses

Merli C

Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham, UK

This paper explores how local people in a province in southern Thailand perceive the practice of male andfemale genital cutting. In order to understand the importance placed on these practices, a comparison is drawn between the two and also between the male circumcision and the Buddhist ordination of monks as rites of passage. Discourses on the exposure or concealment of male and female bodies, respectively, witness to the relevance of both the local political-historical context and biomedical hegemony to gendered bodies. The comparisons evince the need to reflect upon the theoretical and ethical implications of studyinggenital cutting and focusing exclusively on one of the two practices rather than, as this paper claims to be necessary, considering them as inextricably connected.

This article can be purchased in this LINK