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Maternal infibulation and obstetrical outcome in Djibouti.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2014 Sep 19:1-23. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal infibulation and obstetrical outcome in Djibouti.

Minsart AF, N’guyen TS, Hadji RA, Caillet M.

ABSTRACT

The objective of the present study was to assess the relation between female genital mutilation and obstetric outcome in an East African urban clinic with a standardized care, taking into account medical and socioeconomic status. Methods This was a cohort study conducted in Djibouti between October 1, 2012 and April 30, 2014. Overall 643 mothers were interviewed and clinically assessed for the presence of female genital mutilation. The prevalence of obstetric complications by infibulation status was included in a multivariate stepwise regression model. Results Overall, 29 of 643 women did not have any form of mutilation (4.5%), as opposed to 238 of 643 women with infibulation (37.0%), 369 with type 2 (57.4%), and 7 with type 1 mutilation (1.1%).Women with a severe type of mutilation were more likely to have socio-economic and medical risk factors. After adjustment, the only outcome that was significantly related with infibulation was the presence of meconium-stained amniotic fluid with an odds ratio of 1.58 (1.10-2.27), p-value=0.014. Conclusions Infibulation was not related with excess perinatal morbidity in this setting with a very high prevalence of female genital mutilation, but future research should concentrate on the relation between infibulation and meconium.

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Female genital mutilation in Djibouti.

Afr Health Sci. 2012 Dec;12(4):412-5.FREE

Female genital mutilation in Djibouti.

Martinelli M, Ollé-Goig JE. Hôpital Balbala, Djibouti.

ABSTRACT

The practice of female genital mutilation (we will use the latest definition adopted by WHO/UNFP: female genital mutilation/cutting or FGM/C) is still widespread in 28 African countries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that more than two million females undergo some form of genital mutilation every year. Its negative health impact and its ethical and human rights aspects have been discussed and attempts to eliminate it have been the objectives of several meetings promoted by national and international organisations thanks to an increased awareness related to FGM/C in those countries practicing it and also, maybe due to the number of Africans migrating to industrialized countries. We review the present situation in Djibouti, a small country in the Horn of Africa, where 98 % of the female population has suffered different forms of FGM/C.

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Female genital mutilation: applications of nursing theory for clinical care

Nurse Pract. 2011 Apr;36(4):45-50.

Female genital mutilation: applications of nursing theory for clinical care.

Burke E.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a continuing practice among some immigrant groups. As mobility increases among this population, NPs in primary care will continue to see women who have experienced FGM. NPs must gain a better understanding of the practice in order to provide optimal, culturally appropriate clinical care.

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