Tag Archives: Epidermal cyst

Intradermal or subcutaneous saclike structure, the wall of which is stratified epithelium containing keratohyalin granules.

Vulvar Epidermoid Cyst and Type 2 Radical Genital Mutilation

FREECase Rep Obstet Gynecol. 2015;2015:520190. doi: 10.1155/2015/520190. Epub 2015 Nov 22.

Vulvar Epidermoid Cyst and Type 2 Radical Genital Mutilation

Birge O, Ozbey EG, Arslan D, Erkan MM, Demir F, Akgor U

ABSTRACT

About 100 million women are estimated to be circumcised globally. Various rates of complications have been encountered, especially after circumcision, such as bleeding, infection, shock, menstrual irregularity, difficulty in urination or common urinary tract infections, inguinal pain, difficulty in sexual intercourse, and genital circumcision scar especially at the vulvar region, and cystic or solid character mass in short and long term. Furthermore, the maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality increase due to bleeding and fistula, which develop after prolonged labor, travail, and difficult labors. Our aim in this paper was to discuss a 42-year-old multiparous female case who had undergone type 2 radical genital mutilation (circumcision) when she was 7 years of age, along with the literature, which has been evaluated for the gradually growing mass at the left inguinal canal region in the last 10 years and diagnosed as epidermoid inclusion cyst developing secondary to postcircumcision surgical ground trauma, since there was no other case found in the literature search that had been circumcised at such an early age and developing after circumcision at such advanced age, and, therefore, this is suggested to be the first case on this subject.

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Traumatic Vulvar Epithelial Inclusion Cysts Following Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd. 2015 Sep;75(9):945-948.FREE

Traumatic Vulvar Epithelial Inclusion Cysts Following Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Mack-Detlefsen B, Banaschak S, Boemers TM

ABSTRACT

Background: Female genital mutilation (FGM) occurs mainly in Africa, parts of the Arabian Peninsula and parts of Asia. It is commonly associated with acute complications as well as diverse late/delayed complications. One of the most common of these late complications is progressively enlarging painless cysts of the vulva.

Case Report: An 8-year-old girl from Eritrea presented to our paediatric emergency department with a progressively enlarging mass of the vulva. She had undergone a clitoridectomy and partial removal of the labia minora as an infant in Eritrea. We performed surgical excision of the cyst and reconstruction of the labia. Histology showed a traumatic squamous epithelial inclusion cyst of the vulva.

Conclusion: Epithelial or dermoid cysts of the vulva following FGM are extremely rare. Symptoms often require surgical intervention. Through increasing migration, more girls and female youths with FGM are likely to present to practices and hospitals in Germany. Thus increased knowledge and awareness of the medical complications of FGM and their treatment will be necessary in years to come.

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Female genital mutilation/cutting: an update

Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol2015;42(3):300-3.
Female genital mutilation/cutting: an update.
Rouzi AA, Alturki F.
ABSTRACT
Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a cultural practice involving several types of external female genitalia cutting. FGM/C is known to occur in all parts of the world but is most prevalent in 28 countries in Africa and the Middle East and among immigrant communities in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. Studies of FGM/C suffer from many methodological problems including inadequate analysis and an unclear reporting of results. The evidence to link FGM/C to infertility is weak. The management of epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts includes expensive investigations like comprehensive endocrinology tests and MRI resulting in unnecessary anxiety due to delay in surgical treatment. Similarly, unnecessary cesarean sections or rupture of the infibulation scar continue to occur because of the inadequate use of intrapartum defibulation. A significant amount of efforts is required to improve and correct the inadequate care of FGM/C women and girls.

A large clitoral epidermoid inclusion cyst first presenting in adulthood following childhood circumcision.

J Obstet Gynaecol. 2007 May;27(4):445-8.

A large clitoral epidermoid inclusion cyst first presenting in adulthood following childhood circumcision.

Rizk DE, Mohammed KH, Joshi SU, Al-Shabani AY, Bossmar TR.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, United Arab Emirates. rizk.diaa@uaeu.ac.ae PMID: 17654217

There is no ABSTRACT available for this article

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[Epithelial inclusion cyst of the clitoris as a late complication of childhood female circumcision]

Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Jan 7;170(1):59.

[Epithelial inclusion cyst of the clitoris as a late complication of childhood female circumcision]. [Article in Danish]

Kristensen IB.

Baagøes Allé 8A, 2. th, DK-5700 Svendborg. idabk@dadlnet.dk.

ABSTRACT

Two cases of epithelial inclusion cyst as a late complication of childhood female circumcision in patients aged 39 and 27 years are reported. Symptoms were interference with sexual intercourse and discomfort during sitting. Surgical treatment of the condition is known to be effective with few complications and gave correct aesthetic and functional results. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of epithelial inclusion cyst.

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Epidermoid cyst of the clitoris: an unusual cause of clitoromegaly in a patient without history of previous female circumcision.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2009 Oct; 22(5): e130-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2008.10.006. Epub 2009 Jul 3.

Epidermoid cyst of the clitoris: an unusual cause of clitoromegaly in a patient without history of previous female circumcision.

Anderson-Mueller BE, Laudenschlager MD, Hansen KA.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA.

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To describe a rare cause of clitoromegaly. SETTING: University Medical Center. PARTICIPANTS: Patient. INTERVENTION: Magnetic resonance imaging, surgical resection of the cyst, clitoroplasty. RESULTS: Clitoroplasty with removal of the intradermal cyst and resolution of pain. CONCLUSIONS: A 17-year-old immigrant female presented with clitoral pain associated with clitoromegaly. Epidermoid cysts are usually solitary, asymptomatic, slow-growing, proliferations of epidermal cells that are commonly present on the neck, scalp, face, or trunk. There have only been four reported cases of epidermoid cysts of the clitoris not associated with female genital mutilation. The cyst in this case was removed by local excision, and the patient’s pain has resolved.

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[Diagnostic image. A woman with a vulvar swelling]

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2009;153:A115.

[Diagnostic image. A woman with a vulvar swelling]. [Article in Dutch]

Lashley LE, Feitsma HA.

Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, afd. Gynaecologie, Leiden, The Netherlands. lisalashley@hotmail.com

A 25-year-old woman presented with a tumour above the labia minora, due to an epidermal cyst.

There is no link to view this article online.

Clitoral cyst: not a very rare complication of female genital mutilation

Fertil Steril. 2009 92(3): S118

Clitoral cyst: not a very rare complication of female genital mutilation

Rouzi AA

ABSTRACT

No abstract is available for this article

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Epidermal inclusion cyst of the clitoris 30 years after female genital mutilation.

Fertil Steril. 2010 Aug;94(3):1097.e1-3. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2010.02.007. Epub 2010 Mar 16.

Epidermal inclusion cyst of the clitoris 30 years after female genital mutilation.

Asante A, Omurtag K, Roberts C.

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30303, USA. aasant2@emory.edu

OBJECTIVE: To present a case report of a patient with epidermal inclusion cyst as a late complication of female circumcision, the management of the patient, and a review of the literature. DESIGN: Case report and literature review. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENT(S): A 37-year-old female from Guinea with a large clitoral mass of 6 months’ duration. INTERVENTION(S): Complete history and physical exam of the patient and subsequent surgical resection of the cyst. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Diagnosis, surgical management, and postoperative sexual function and emotional well-being. RESULT(S): Resolution of swelling and discomfort, satisfactory postoperative sexual function and emotional well-being. CONCLUSION(S): There should be awareness of one of the relatively common delayed complications of female genital circumcision and familiarity with its surgical management. Overall, surgical management appears to be effective, and there is no documented risk of recurrence.

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Epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts: not a rare complication of female genital mutilation.

FREEHum Reprod. 2010 Jul;25(7):1672-4. doi: 10.1093/humrep/deq126. Epub 2010 May 22.

Epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts: not a rare complication of female genital mutilation.

Rouzi AA.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80215, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. aarouzi@gmail.com

BACKGROUND: Although female genital mutilation (FGM) does not feature in Judeo-Christian populations, it is estimated that, 100-140 million women in the world have undergone some form of FGM. Given the increasing diversity of the western populations, a review of specific complications of FGM is of paramount importance to practicing clinicians. The objective of this study is to report a case series of epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts after FGM in a Muslim population primarily from the Middle East. METHODS: Between January 1998 and July 2009, 32 females underwent surgical removal of epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts in a tertiary referral university hospital. Data regarding age, clinical presentation, operation time, estimated blood loss, presence of intraoperative and post-operative complications, duration of admission to the hospital and long-term follow-up were extracted from the records. RESULTS: There were 15 women (46.9%) with a definitive history of FGM, 14 (43.8%) did not know whether they had FGM or not and 3 (9.3%) had no history of FGM and were excluded from the analysis. The mean age of subjects was 28.1 years (range 5-91 years). All presented with increasing clitoral mass over a mean duration of 5.2 +/- 4.1 years. The mean diameter of the cyst was 4.2 +/- 2 cm. Regarding treatment, 28 subjects underwent surgical excision, and one underwent incision and drainage of a clitoral abscess. No short- or long-term complications occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Clitoral cysts appear to be a more common complication of FGM than previously thought. Publication of studies that highlight the medical complications of FGM should be encouraged to advocate abandonment of the procedure.

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