Tag Archives: Eritrea

Traumatic Vulvar Epithelial Inclusion Cysts Following Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd. 2015 Sep;75(9):945-948.FREE

Traumatic Vulvar Epithelial Inclusion Cysts Following Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Mack-Detlefsen B, Banaschak S, Boemers TM

ABSTRACT

Background: Female genital mutilation (FGM) occurs mainly in Africa, parts of the Arabian Peninsula and parts of Asia. It is commonly associated with acute complications as well as diverse late/delayed complications. One of the most common of these late complications is progressively enlarging painless cysts of the vulva.

Case Report: An 8-year-old girl from Eritrea presented to our paediatric emergency department with a progressively enlarging mass of the vulva. She had undergone a clitoridectomy and partial removal of the labia minora as an infant in Eritrea. We performed surgical excision of the cyst and reconstruction of the labia. Histology showed a traumatic squamous epithelial inclusion cyst of the vulva.

Conclusion: Epithelial or dermoid cysts of the vulva following FGM are extremely rare. Symptoms often require surgical intervention. Through increasing migration, more girls and female youths with FGM are likely to present to practices and hospitals in Germany. Thus increased knowledge and awareness of the medical complications of FGM and their treatment will be necessary in years to come.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Experiences from pregnancy and childbirth related to female genital mutilation among Eritrean immigrant women in Sweden.

Midwifery. 2008 Jun;24(2):214-25. Epub 2007 Feb 21.

Experiences from pregnancy and childbirth related to female genital mutilation among Eritrean immigrant women in Sweden.

Lundberg PC, Gerezgiher A.

Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Pranee.Lundberga@pubcare.uu.se

OBJECTIVE: to explore Eritrean immigrant women’s experiences of female genital mutilation (FGM) during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period.

DESIGN: qualitative study using an ethnographic approach. Data were collected via tape-recorded interviews.

SETTING: interviews in the Eritrean women’s homes located in and around Uppsala, Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: 15 voluntary Eritrean immigrant women.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Semi-structured interview and open-ended questions were used. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed.

FINDINGS: six themes of experiences of FGM among Eritrean women during pregnancy and childbirth were identified. They are (1) fear and anxiety; (2) extreme pain and long-term complications; (3) health-care professionals’ knowledge of circumcision and health-care system; (4) support from family, relatives and friends; (5) de-infibulation; and (6) decision against female circumcision of daughters.

KEY CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: the Eritrean women had experiences of FGM and had suffered from its complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Midwives and obstetricians should have competence in managing women with FGM, and they need increased understanding of cultural epistemology in order to be able to provide quality care to these women. At antenatal centres, circumcised women should be advised to de-infibulate before pregnancy. Special courses about anatomical differences should be offered to these women and their husbands. It is also important to inform them about Swedish law, which prohibits all forms of FGM.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

“Never My Daughters”: A Qualitative Study Regarding Attitude Change Toward Female Genital Cutting Among Ethiopian and Eritrean Families in Sweden

Health Care Women Int. 2009 30(1-2): 114-133

“Never My Daughters”: A Qualitative Study Regarding Attitude Change Toward Female Genital Cutting Among Ethiopian and Eritrean Families in Sweden

Johnsdotter S, Moussa K, Carlbom A, Aregai R, Birgitta Essén B

ABSTRACT

To explore attitudes toward female genital cutting (FGC) in a migration perspective, qualitative interviews were conducted with men and women from Ethiopia and Eritrea in Sweden. We found firm rejection of all forms of FGC and absence of a guiding motive. Informants failed to see any meaning in upholding the custom. We conclude that children of Ethiopian or Eritrean parents resident in Sweden run little risk of being subjected to FGC. A societal structure prepared to deal with suspected cases of FGC with a high level of alertness should be combined with a healthy sceptical attitude toward exaggerations of risk estimates.

This article can be purchased in this LINK