Tag Archives: Europe

‘Female genital mutilation’ in Europe: Public discourse versus empirical evidence

International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Available online 2 May 2017.

‘Female genital mutilation’ in Europe: Public discourse versus empirical evidence

Johnsdotter SMestre i Mestre RM 

HIGHLIGHTS

• There is a discrepancy between public discourse and empirical evidence regarding ‘female genital mutilation’ in Europe.

• Framing FGM as a widespread social problem in Europe creates myths about activities among immigrant communities.

• An analysis of court cases in Europe shows that the typical European case is FGM performed in Africa.

• Public discourse regarding FGM needs to be challenged in multicultural democracies under the rule of law.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital circumcision/mutilation: implications for female urogynaecological health.

Int Urogynecol J. 2013 Jul 16. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital circumcision/mutilation: implications for female urogynaecological health.

Teufel K, Dörfler DM.

Hospital of St. Poelten, St. Poelten, Austria, katharinateufel@gmx.at.

ABSTRACT

“Female genital circumcision” or “female genital mutilation”, as it is called more often, is an operation that is primarily carried out in Africa. Owing to migration, physicians are increasingly confronted with this issue in Western countries as well. A range of negative effects may result from this operation and this article aims to address consequences for female pelvic health. Special emphasis is placed on urogynaecological health consequences; in particular, on “voiding difficulties”, “recurrent urinary tract infections” and “vesicovaginal fistula”. All of these occur mostly in infibulated women, i.e. in women whose genitalia are sealed by the most severe form of circumcision. Some of the problems that may emerge as a result of the operation can be resolved by defibulation (i.e. surgical reopening of the sealed vulva). Female genital circumcision is a sensitive topic even in the area of research and reliable data are therefore scarce.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Female genital mutilation: a hidden epidemic (statement from the European Academy of Paediatrics).

Eur J Pediatr. 2013 Aug 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital mutilation: a hidden epidemic (statement from the European Academy of Paediatrics).

Sauer PJ, Neubauer D.

Beatrix Children Hospital/UMCG, PO BOX 30.001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands, p.j.j.sauer@umcg.nl.

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation or female circumcision is frequently performed worldwide. It is estimated by the World Health Organisation that worldwide, 100-140 million girls and women currently have to live with the consequences of female genital mutilation. The article argues that the tradition is one of the causes, while another four possible reasons for undergoing such cruel mutilation of young girls exist. Today, there exists a classification of at least four different ways of such mutilation which has no health benefits, and it harms girls and women in many ways. Long-term consequences like recurrent urinary tract infections, dysmenorrhea, sexual problems, infertility and complications both for the mother and infant at delivery are mentioned. Female genital mutilation is a violation of the fundamental human rights, as well as a savage breach of the integrity and personality. Conclusion: The European Academy of Paediatrics advises its members to initiate appropriate counselling for parents and female adolescents regarding the risk of female genital mutilation and strongly condemns female genital mutilation and councils its members not to perform such procedures.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

[Female circumcision–a new issue for gynecologists practicing in the E.U. countries?]. [Article in Polish]

Ginekol Pol. 2009 Feb;80(2):118-23.

[Female circumcision–a new issue for gynecologists practicing in the E.U. countries?]. [Article in Polish]

Rogowska-Szadkowska D, Niemiec T.

Zaklad Medycyny Rodzinnej i Pielegniarstwa Srodowiskowego Uniwersytetu Medycznego w Białymstoku. dszadkowska@umwb.edu.pl

ABSTRACT

An increasing number of immigrants from countries practicing female genital mutilation (FGM) has begun to concern Europe as well. The aim of this article is to present recent medical data about FGM which, in the age of globalisation and migration of people, may become essential for gynaecologists working in Poland, but also those practising abroad.

There is no LINK to view this article online.

Health Care in Europe for Women with Genital Mutilation

Health Care for Women International. 2006 27(4) 362-378

Health Care in Europe for Women with Genital Mutilation

Els Leye, Richard A. Powell, Gerda Nienhuis, Patricia Claeys & Marleen Temmerman

ABSTRACT

The increasing number of immigrants from African countries practicing female genital mutilation (FGM) has raised concern in Europe. Health care professionals have developed three main responses: (1) technical guidelines for clinical management; (2) codes of conduct on quality of care; and (3) specialised health services for medical and psychological care and counselling. Much remains to be done, however, to ensure adequate care in Europe: (1) medico-legal/ethical discussions; (2) development of protocols to assist in making informed decisions; and (3) development of guidelines on counselling, communication strategies, and referral procedures. All agencies working in the field of FGM should be interlinked at the national level, in which members of the affected communities should be included. At the European level, a coordinated approach between all agencies should be developed.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Care of women with female genital mutilation/cutting.

Swiss Med Wkly. 2011 Jan 6;140:w13137. doi: 10.4414/smw.2010.13137.

Care of women with female genital mutilation/cutting.

Abdulcadir J, Margairaz C, Boulvain M, Irion O.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospitals of Geneva, 30, Bld de la Cluse, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. jasmine.abdulcadir@hcuge.ch

ABSTRACT

In multi-ethnic European society medical professionals are faced with an increasing number of women originating from countries where female genital mutilations/cuttings (FGM/C) are practised. Recent studies, however, emphasise the lack of knowledge on this subject. This review article aims to present FGM/C as a complex socio-healthcare and multidisciplinary issue, outlining the definition, classification, epidemiology and anthropologico-legal aspects of FGM/C. It explains the approach to be adopted to FGM/C women, focusing on
defibulation, clitoral restoration/repair and re-infibulation. Finally, it reports on the discussions surrounding pricking/nicking and the proposals for alternative rituals in recent years.

This article can be accessed for free in this LINK

A case study perspective on psychological outcomes after female genital mutilation.

J Obstet Gynaecol. 2012 Aug;32(6):560-5.

A case study perspective on psychological outcomes after female genital mutilation.

Pereda N, Arch M, Pérez-González A.

Grup de Recerca en Victimització Infantil i Adolescent (GReVIA) and Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (IR3C).

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is still performed throughout Africa and in a few countries of Asia and the Middle East, affecting over 100 million females worldwide. It includes procedures that intentionally injure female external genital organs for non-medical reasons, and can have deleterious consequences for the physical, psychological and sexual lives of its victims. This paper presents three case studies illustrating the psychological and sexual consequences of FGM. Data were gathered about child and family history, employment, medical and psychiatric history, and the genital mutilation experienced. Self-report measures of self-esteem, mental health status and sexual life were also administered. The results obtained highlight the need for European professionals to develop greater knowledge about FGM and its serious consequences, especially as regards sexuality. This is particularly important given the large numbers of immigrant women now residing within EU countries.

This article can be purchased in this LINK