Tag Archives: Female

Towards a gender perspective in qualitative research on voluntary medical male circumcision in east and southern Africa

Glob Public Health. 2015 Mar 2:1-13. [Epub ahead of print]

Towards a gender perspective in qualitative research on voluntary medical male circumcision in east and southern Africa

Martínez Pérez G, Triviño Durán L, Gasch A, Desmond N

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization endorsed voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in 2007 as an effective method to provide partial protection against heterosexual female-to-male transmission of HIV in regions with high rates of such transmission, and where uptake of VMMC is low. Qualitative research conducted in east and southern Africa has focused on assessing acceptability, barriers to uptake of VMMC and the likelihood of VMMC increasing men’s adoption of risky sexual behaviours. Less researched, however, have been the perceptions of women and sexual minorities towards VMMC, even though they are more vulnerable to HIV/AIDS transmission than are heterosexual men. The purpose of this paper is to identify core areas in which a gendered perspective in qualitative research might improve the understanding and framing of VMMC in east and southern Africa. Issues explored in this analysis are risk compensation, the post-circumcision appearance of the penis, inclusion of men who have sex with men as study respondents and the antagonistic relation between VMMC and female genital cutting. If biomedical and social science researchers explore these issues in future qualitative inquiry utilising a gendered perspective, a more thorough understanding of VMMC can be achieved, which could ultimately inform policy and implementation.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Consider the personhood of women who experienced genital cutting

Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Oct;88(10):1180. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.08.004.

Consider the personhood of women who experienced genital cutting.

Bergstrom AR, Nur F, Davis DL.

NO ABSTRACT IS AVAILABLE

Comment in Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Oct;88(10):1180-1.

Comment on Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Jun;88(6):618-29.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

In reply-consider the personhood of women who experienced genital cutting.

Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Oct;88(10):1180-1. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.08.003.

In reply-consider the personhood of women who experienced genital cutting.

Hearst A, Molnar A.

NO ABSTRACT IS AVAILABLE

Comment on:

Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Oct;88(10):1180.

Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Jun;88(6):618-29.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation, cutting, or circumcision.

Obstet Gynecol Int. 2013;2013:240421. doi: 10.1155/2013/240421. Epub 2013 Nov 27.FREE

Female genital mutilation, cutting, or circumcision.

Sundby J(1), Essén B(2), Johansen RE(3).

Author information: (1)Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Norway. (2)Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Uppsala University, Sweden. (3)Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.

EXTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM), female genital cutting, or female circumcision of women, the theme addressed in this special issue has many terms. The short form acronym FGM is understood by most, and it does contain the notion that we are talking about a traditional practice that is harmful. The practice affects women in diaspora as well as African countries, and men are involved as decision makers and attitude changers. Cutting is a neutral term, and circumcision is a more traditional terminology. Each term carries a certain value. But the practice is the same regardless of name.

In order to understand the tradition, assist women who have undergone it, and promote action against it, it is important to have solid knowledge. This knowledge is partly medical and partly social. Thus, research based on a multitude of methods is warranted. This special issue is indeed a combination of social science and medical research on different aspects of the practice, that is also a genital health hazard for women….

This article can be downloaded in this LINK

Facts and controversies on female genital mutilation and Islam.

Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2013 Feb;18(1):10-4. doi: 10.3109/13625187.2012.749982. Epub 2013 Jan 4.

Facts and controversies on female genital mutilation and Islam.

Rouzi AA.

ABSTRACT

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. aarouzi@gmail.com Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a very ancient traditional and cultural ritual. Strategies and policies have been implemented to abandon this practice. However, despite commendable work, it is still prevalent, mainly in Muslim countries. FGM predates Islam. It is not mentioned in the Qur’an (the verbatim word of God in Islam). Muslim religious authorities agree that all types of mutilation, including FGM, are condemned. ‘Sensitivity’ to cultural traditions that erroneously associate FGM with Islam is misplaced. The principle of ‘do no harm’, endorsed by Islam, supersedes cultural practices, logically eliminating FGM from receiving any Islamic religious endorsement.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation: classification and management.

Nurs Stand. 2007 Oct 24-30;22(7):43-9; quiz 50.

Female genital mutilation: classification and management.

Bikoo M.

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and Obstetric Hospital, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London. maligaye.bikoo@uclh.nhs.uk

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation is a deeply rooted cultural tradition observed primarily in Africa and among certain communities in the Middle East and Asia. It has considerable health consequences. Women from the practising communities are increasingly seen within healthcare settings but few healthcare professionals are trained to treat their specific healthcare needs.

There is no link to view this article online.