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The effects of female genital mutilation on the onset of sexual activity and marriage in Guinea.

Arch Sex Behav. 2009 Apr;38(2):178-85. Epub 2007 Oct 18.

The effects of female genital mutilation on the onset of sexual activity and marriage in Guinea.

Van Rossem R, Gage AJ. Vakgroep Sociologie, Universiteit Gent, Korte Meer 3-5, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. ronan.vanrossem@ugent.be

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is almost universal in Guinea and practiced by all ethnic and religious groups and social classes, although the prevalence of the various types of FGM varies by socioeconomic group. A common explanation for FGM practices is that they contribute to the social control over female sexuality and enhance the marriageability of women. These claims were tested using the 1999 Guinea Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) (N = 6753). Event history techniques were used to examine the effect of type of FGM on the age at first sex and the age at first marriage and logistic regression for the effect of FGM on premarital sex. The results showed that the type of FGM had a significant zero-order effect on the age at first marriage and the prevalence of premarital sex, but not on the age at first sex. However, these effects became non-significant once controls for age, religion, ethnicity, education, residence, and wealth were added to the model. Variations in sexual behavior, therefore, were unrelated to type of FGM, but reflected differences in the social characteristics of the participants.

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German technical cooperation (GTZ) supra-regional project: promotion of initiatives to end female genital mutilation (FGM).

Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):18-23.

German technical cooperation (GTZ) supra-regional project: promotion of initiatives to end female genital mutilation (FGM).

Finke E.

No abstract is available for this article.

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Categories
Archives Blog Original research

Attitudes toward the discontinuation of female genital cutting among men and women in Guinea

Int J Gynecol Obstet. 2006;92(1):92–96.

Attitudes toward the discontinuation of female genital cutting among men and women in Guinea

Gage AJ, Van Rossem R

Abstract

Objective. To investigate socioeconomic correlates of and gender differences in attitudinal support for the discontinuation of FGC in Guinea.

Method. Data from structured interviews of men aged 15–59 and women aged 15–49 years in the 1999 Demographic and Health Survey and multiple logistic regression methods were used to examine the relationship of socioeconomic factors and gender to attitudinal support for the discontinuation of FGC.

Result. More than 9 out of 10 women had undergone FGC. Attitudinal support for FGC discontinuation was more prevalent among men than women. The odds of supporting the discontinuation of FGC were negatively related to beliefs in social approval of and religious support for FGC and its enhancement of women’s marriageability, the number of perceived advantages of FGC, and women’s low socioeconomic status.

Conclusion. Community education, improvements in women’s socioeconomic status and traditional and religious leader involvement would be critical for FGC eradication.

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