Tag Archives: Health Education

Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.

Health information interventions for female genital mutilation.

FREEInt J Gynaecol Obstet. 2017 Feb;136 Suppl 1:79-82. doi:10.1002/ijgo.12052.

Health information interventions for female genital mutilation.

Smith H, Stein K.

ABSTRACT

Providing information and education to women and girls living with female genital mutilation (FGM) could be an important influence on their healthcare-seeking behavior. Healthcare providers also need adequate knowledge and skills to provide good quality care to this population. Recent WHO guidelines on managing health complications from FGM contain best practice statements for health education and information interventions for women and providers. This qualitative evidence synthesis summarizes the values and preferences of girls and women living with FGM, and healthcare providers, together with other evidence on the context and conditions of these interventions. The synthesis highlights that healthcare providers lack skills and training to manage women, and women are concerned about the lack of discussion about FGM with providers. There is a need for more training for providers, and further research to understand how health information interventions may be perceived or experienced by women living with FGM in different contexts.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Changing practices and shifting meanings of female genital cutting among the Maasai of Arusha and Manyara regions of Tanzania.

Cult Health Sex. 2017 Apr 18:1-16. doi: 10.1080/13691058.2017.1313449. [Epub ahead of print]

Changing practices and shifting meanings of female genital cutting among the Maasai of Arusha and Manyara regions of Tanzania.

Van Bavel H, Coene G, Leye E.

ABSTRACT

Using mixed methods that combined participant observation and semi-structured in-depth interviews, this study looked at changing practices and shifting meanings of female genital cutting among the Maasai people in Tanzania. The findings suggest that an increasing social pressure to abandon female genital cutting has inspired the hiding of the practice, causing the actual cutting to become detached from its traditional ceremonial connotations. This detaching of cutting from ceremony has created a shift in meanings: the ceremony still carries the meaning of passage into adulthood, while the cutting seems to function as a way of inscribing Maasai identity into the body. The detaching of genital cutting from ceremony offers those willing to continue the practice the opportunity to do so without being prosecuted, and those unwilling to undergo or perform the practice the opportunity to evade it by faking the cutting without being socially sanctioned for it. Findings also suggest changing attitudes towards the practice among the younger generation as the result of education. Maasai culture and the practice of female genital cutting are not static but actively challenged and reinterpreted from within the community, with formally schooled and women taking up leading roles in reshaping gender norms.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Educating about female genital mutilation.

Educ Prim Care. 2016 Oct 28:1-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Educating about female genital mutilation.

Holmes V, Farrington R, Mulongo P

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is illegal in the UK but nevertheless practised in some immigrant communities. Effective educational approaches are required to inform policy and to direct resources, often in the voluntary sector. The opinions in this article arise from discussions with professionals and members of FGM-practising communities. We highlight the importance of sharing experiences and expertise across health and social care professionals as well as working in partnership with culturally sensitive Non-Governmental Organisations. Enlisting the support of men and religious leaders is crucial to breaking down barriers in male-dominated communities and dispelling myths about FGM being a ‘requirement’ of faith.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female Genital Mutilation: What Health Educators Should Know

Journal of Health Education. 1999, 30(4):222-228

Female genital mutilation: what health educators should know

Ausherman JA, Welshimer KJ & Black JM

ABSTRACT

This article provides an overview of the issues surrounding the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM is a general term used to describe various forms of genital cutting that are performed on girls and women. There is a definitive need for health education professionals to gain awareness and develop an understanding of this practice. Increasingly, health educators will be called on to teach others about this practice. To be effective, health educators need to develop an understanding of the terminology, the procedure, the extent of the incidence and prevalence of the practice, worldwide prevention efforts, and the various roles that professional health educators can play. This information can be used as a basic guide for the development of curricula, lesson plans, or educational materials for use in schools, communities, work sites, and health care settings.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Evidence to inform education, training and supportive work environments for midwives involved in the care of women with female genital mutilation: A review of global experience

Midwifery. 2014 Sep 6. pii: S0266-6138(14)00222-8. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2014.08.012. [Epub ahead of print]

Evidence to inform education, training and supportive work environments for midwives involved in the care of women with female genital mutilation: A review of global experience.

Dawson A, Turkmani S, Fray S, Nanayakkara S, Varol N, Homer C.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to identify how midwives in low and middle income countries (LMIC) and high income countries (HIC) care for women with female genital mutilation (FGM), their perceived challenges and what professional development and workplace strategies might better support midwives to provide appropriate quality care.

DESIGN: an integrative review involving a narrative synthesis of the literature was undertaken to include peer reviewed research literature published between 2004 and 2014.

FINDINGS: 10 papers were included in the review, two from LMIC and eight from HIC. A lack of technical knowledge and limited cultural competency was identified, as well as socio-cultural challenges in the abandonment process of the practice, particularly in LMIC settings. Training in the area of FGM was limited. One study reported the outcomes of an education initiative that was found to be beneficial.

KEY CONCLUSIONS: professional education and training, a working environment supported by guidelines and responsive policy and community education, are necessary to enable midwives to improve the care of women with FGM and advocate against the practice.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: improved opportunities for midwives to learn about FGM and receive advice and support, alongside opportunities for collaborative practice in contexts that enable the effective reporting of FGM to authorities, may be beneficial and require further investigation.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital cutting: A survey among healthcare professionals in Italy.

J Obstet Gynaecol. 2014 Sep 29:1-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital cutting: A survey among healthcare professionals in Italy.

Surico D, Amadori R, Gastaldo LB, Tinelli R, Surico N.

ABSTRACT

This study aims to evaluate the knowledge of female genital cutting (FGC) in a tertiary teaching hospital in Italy. A survey questionnaire on FGC was given to paediatricians, nurses, midwives, gynaecologists and residents in paediatrics and gynaecology in a tertiary teaching hospital in Italy. The results of the survey were then analysed. The results showed that 71.5% (73/102) of healthcare professionals dealt with patients presenting with FGC. Gynaecologists (83%) and paediatric nurses (75%) were the only ones who declared to be aware of Italian law on FGC. In detail, 55% of midwives, 50% of paediatricians, 50% of paediatrician residents and 28.5% of gynaecological residents were aware of this law. The general knowledge of Italian National Guidelines on FGC is even worse: most professionals are not aware of protocols of action. Considering the increasing extension of FGC due to immigration, improvement of care through specialised education of healthcare providers is mandatory.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Meaning-making of female genital cutting: children’s perception and acquired knowledge of the ritual.

Int J Womens Health. 2013 Apr 15;5:165-75. doi: 10.2147/IJWH.S40447. Print 2013.FREE

Meaning-making of female genital cutting: children’s perception and acquired knowledge of the ritual.

Schultz JH, Lien IL.

Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT

How do girls who have undergone female genital cutting understand the ritual? This study provides an analysis of the learning process and knowledge acquired in their meaning-making process. Eighteen participants were interviewed in qualitative indepth interviews. Women in Norway, mostly with Somali or Gambian backgrounds, were asked about their experiences of circumcision. Two different strategies were used to prepare girls for circumcision, ie, one involving giving some information and the other keeping the ritual a secret. Findings indicate that these two approaches affected the girls’ meaning-making differently, but both strategies seemed to lead to the same educational outcome. The learning process is carefully monitored and regulated but is brought to a halt, stopping short of critical reflexive thinking. The knowledge tends to be deeply internalized, embodied, and morally embraced. The meaning-making process is discussed by analyzing the use of metaphors and narratives. Given that the educational outcome is characterized by limited knowledge without critical reflection, behavior change programs to end female genital cutting should identify and implement educational stimuli that are likely to promote critical reflexive thinking.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Australia aims to eliminate female genital mutilation

BMJ. 2012 Dec 17;345:e8553. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e8553.FREE

Australia aims to eliminate female genital mutilation.

Sweet M.

EXTRACT

The Australian government has announced a suite of measures aimed at eliminating female genital mutilation, a practice that it has described as “barbaric” and “horrific.”

A joint statement by the prime minister, Julia Gillard, and the health minister, Tanya Plibersek, said that a national summit involving health, legal, and policing experts would be held early next year to raise awareness of the issue.1

The government also announced funding of $A0.5m (£0.3m; €0.4m; $US0.5m) for community awareness and education activities and said that new research and data collection on female genital mutilation would be a priority.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Genital mutilation as an expression of power structures: ending FGM through education, empowerment of women and removal of taboos.

Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):13-7.

Genital mutilation as an expression of power structures: ending FGM through education, empowerment of women and removal of taboos.

Finke E.

There is no ABSTRACT available for this article.

There is no LINK available to view this article online.

Effectiveness of Interventions Designed to Prevent Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: A Systematic Review

Stud Fam Plann. 2012 June 43(2): 135-146

Effectiveness of Interventions Designed to Prevent Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: A Systematic Review

Berg RC, Denison E

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is widely considered a human rights infringement, although communities that practice the tradition view it as an integral part of their culture. Given these vastly different views, the effectiveness of efforts to abandon FGM/C is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review of the best available evidence regarding evaluations of interventions to prevent FGM/C, including eight controlled before-and-after studies with 7,042 participants from Africa. Findings indicate that 19 of 49 outcomes (with baseline similarity) were significantly different at study level, mostly favoring the intervention, but results from four meta-analyses showed considerable heterogeneity. The limited effectiveness and weak overall quality of the evidence from the studies appear related to methodological limitations of the studies and shortcomings in the implementation of the interventions. Nevertheless, the findings point to possible advantageous developments from the interventions.

This article can be purchased in this LINK