Tag Archives: Health Surveys

Female genital cutting: A survey among healthcare professionals in Italy.

J Obstet Gynaecol. 2014 Sep 29:1-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital cutting: A survey among healthcare professionals in Italy.

Surico D, Amadori R, Gastaldo LB, Tinelli R, Surico N.

ABSTRACT

This study aims to evaluate the knowledge of female genital cutting (FGC) in a tertiary teaching hospital in Italy. A survey questionnaire on FGC was given to paediatricians, nurses, midwives, gynaecologists and residents in paediatrics and gynaecology in a tertiary teaching hospital in Italy. The results of the survey were then analysed. The results showed that 71.5% (73/102) of healthcare professionals dealt with patients presenting with FGC. Gynaecologists (83%) and paediatric nurses (75%) were the only ones who declared to be aware of Italian law on FGC. In detail, 55% of midwives, 50% of paediatricians, 50% of paediatrician residents and 28.5% of gynaecological residents were aware of this law. The general knowledge of Italian National Guidelines on FGC is even worse: most professionals are not aware of protocols of action. Considering the increasing extension of FGC due to immigration, improvement of care through specialised education of healthcare providers is mandatory.

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Estimates of female genital mutilation/cutting in 27 African countries and Yemen.

Stud Fam Plann. 2013 Jun;44(2):189-204. doi: 10.1111/j.1728-4465.2013.00352.x.

Estimates of female genital mutilation/cutting in 27 African countries and Yemen.

Yoder PS, Wang S, Johansen E.

ICF Macro, 11785 Beltsville Drive, Suite 300, Calverton, MD 20705, USA. Stan.Yoder@icfi.com

ABSTRACT

The practice of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) has been documented in many countries in Africa and in several countries in Asia and the Middle East, yet producing reliable data concerning its prevalence and the numbers of girls and women affected has proved a major challenge. This study provides estimates of the total number of women aged 15 years and older who have undergone FGM/C in 27 African countries and Yemen. Drawing on national population-based survey data regarding FGM/C prevalence and census data regarding the number of women in each country, we find that almost 87 million girls and women aged 15 and older have been cut in these 28 countries. Producing reliable figures for the number of women affected by FGM/C in these countries allows researchers and program directors to better comprehend the impact of the practice and to mobilize resources for advocacy against it.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

A survey on knowledge of female genital mutilation guidelines.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Jul;92(7):858-61. doi: 10.1111/aogs.12144. Epub 2013 May 10.

A survey on knowledge of female genital mutilation guidelines.

Purchase TC, Lamoudi M, Colman S, Allen S, Latthe P, Jolly K.

College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

ABSTRACT

The increase in immigration from countries with a high prevalence of female genital mutilation (FGM) has highlighted the need for knowledge and sensitivity in this area of healthcare in high-resource countries. We have surveyed with an online questionnaire 607 members, fellows and trainees of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) on knowledge about the RCOG guidelines for FGM. Completed training and more practical experience with women affected by FGM significantly increased knowledge. Many respondents were not aware of specialist services locally (22.9%) or how to access them (52.3%). Some areas of insufficient knowledge were identified, in particular in relation to psychiatric morbidity, HIV, hepatitis B and pelvic infection. More specialized training efforts might improve this aspect.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Benin: Report on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) or Female Genital Cutting (FGC)

United States Department of State. 2001.FREE

Benin: Report on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) or Female Genital Cutting (FGC), 1 June 2001 

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EXTRACT

…The Benin chapter of the Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children (IAC) conducted a survey in 1992. It estimated that the percentage of women who have undergone this procedure is close to 30 percent. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the percentage is closer to 50 percent. However, this figure appears high to many locally based physicians and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

The 1992 survey found that while Type II or excision is widely practiced, the practice is not uniformly distributed throughout the country. It occurs in the northern part of the country, particularly in the departments of Atacora, Borgou, Zou and Alibori. It also occurs in some communities in the southern coastal department of Oueme. The ethnic groups most affected are the Bariba, Peul, Boko, Baatonau, Wama and Nago. The Wama and the Peul (Fulani) ethnic groups perpetrate the practice in Atacora…

This report can be accessed in this LINK

Women’s empowerment and the intention to continue the practice of female genital cutting in Egypt.

Arch Iran Med. 2009 Mar;12(2):154-60. FREE

Women’s empowerment and the intention to continue the practice of female genital cutting in Egypt.

Afifi M.

Department of Primary Health Care, MOH (HQ), P.O. Box 1853, Dubai, UAE. afifidr@yahoo.co.uk

BACKGROUND: The study aimed to (dis)prove the association of the level of women’s empowerment with their future intention to perpetuate female genital cutting for their daughters.

METHODS: In a national representative community-based sample of 14,393 currently-married women in Egypt, the level of empowerment, intention to continue the practice, and other socio- demographic variables were collected in the 2000 Egypt Demographic and Health Survey. Secondary in-depth analysis was conducted on data downloaded from MEASURE Demographic Health Surveys (MEASURE DHS) website.

RESULTS: About 14% of the women intended to discontinue the practice. Twenty-six percent of the women were empowered in all household decisions. Levels of women’s empowerment adjusted for age, residence, education, interaction between empowerment and education, work status, and female genital cutting status of currently-married women were entered in six logistic regression models in a sequential way.

CONCLUSION: In the last model, those of high levels of empowerment and education were 8.06 times more likely not intending to perpetuate female genital cutting for their daughters than low- empowered low-educated women.

This article can be accessed for free in this LINK

Female genital cutting starts to decline among women in Oromia, Ethiopia.

Reprod Biomed Online. 2010 Jun;20(7):867-72. doi: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2010.01.009. Epub 2010 Feb 1.

Female genital cutting starts to decline among women in Oromia, Ethiopia.

Rahlenbeck S, Mekonnen W, Melkamu Y.

Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. rahlenbeck@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

The study explored factors influencing attitudes towards the practice of female genital cutting (FGC) among women in Oromia region, Ethiopia. Representative data from 2221 women aged 15-49 years from the Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey in 2005 were evaluated. Overall, 88.4% of women had undergone FGC. Prevalence significantly decreased with birth date, ranging from 95.1% in women aged 45-49 years to 75.8% in those aged 15-19 years. Overall, 63.7% of women favoured the discontinuation of FGC, while 29.7% favoured its continuation. Education was strongly correlated with a stance against the practice: while only 54.6% of illiterate women were against it, this figure was 95.5% among women who had completed secondary school. While the reported prevalence was similar among Christian (87.8%) and Islamic women (89.1%), 56.3% of Islamic women favoured discontinuation compared with 70.5% of Christian women. The higher that women scored on empowerment indices, the more they opposed the practice. In logistic regression models, educational level (P=0.001), personal FGC experience (P=0.001), religious affiliation (P=0.02) and self-empowerment were factors (P=0.01 and P=0.004) significantly associated with favouring discontinuation. Future efforts encouraging an end to FGC must include the illiterate population in the Oromia region and focus on improving the status of women.

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