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African Sexuality: A reader

Pambazuka Press has published the book “African Sexualities: A Reader”, a collection of research and opinion papers edited by the Ugandese writer Sylvia Tamale.

In this book the following works can be found:

1. Introduction, by Sylvia Tamale

2. Researching and Theorizing Sexualities in Africa, by Sylvia Tamale

3. Doing Research on Sexuality in Africa: Ethical Dilemmas and the Positioning of the Researcher, by Emídio Gune and Sandra Manuel

4. From Minuscule Biomedical Models to Sexuality’s Depths, by Stella Nyanzi

5. Tracks: Researching Sexualities Walking AbOUT the city of Johannesburg, by Zethu Matebeni

6. Dialoguing Culture and Sex: Reflections from the Field, by Amy S Tsanga

7. Subversion & Resistance: Activist Initiatives, by Jane Bennett

8. The ‘Perils’ of Sex and the Panics of Race: The Dangers of Inter-Racial Sex in Colonial Southern Rhodesia, by Oliver Phillips

9. Nudity and Morality: Legislating Women’s Bodies and Dress in Nigeria, by Bibi Bakare-Yusuf

10. “Getting the Nation Talking about Sex”: Reflections on the Politics of Sexuality and ‘Nation-Building’ in Post-Apartheid South Africa, by Deborah Posel

11. Paradoxes of sex work and sexuality in modern- day Uganda, by  Sylvia Tamale

12. Life Story: Love, Power and Resilience, by Daughtie Akoth

13. African LGBTI Declaration, by 14. Poem: Two Kinds of Blue, by Connie Mutua

15. Life Story & Poem: A Night in Zanzibar, by Jessica Horn

16. Poem: False Memory, by Jumoke Verissimo

17. Dear Diary, by Lindiwe Nkutha

18. Poem: Explain, by Hakima Abbas

19. Poem: My Love (for Eudy Simelane), by Musa Okwonga

20. Representing African Sexualities
m by Desiree Lewis

21. Pious Stardom: Cinema and the Islamic Revival in Egypt, by Karim Mahmoud Tartoussieh

22. Intersex: The Forgotten Constituency, by Julius Kaggwa

23. The Chronicle of an Intersexed Activist’s Journey , by Sally Gross

24. Gender Dynamics: A Transsexual Overview, by Audrey Mbugua

25. Barrenness and Sexuality in the Ndau Community, by Rebecca Magorokosho

26. “Osunality” (Or African Eroticism), by Nkiru Nzegwu

27. Politics of naming sexual practices, by Brigitte Bagnol & Esmeralda Mariano LME

28. Fiction: My American Jon, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

29. Life Story: Questions, Questions, by Lucy Nambajjwe

30. Fiction: Penitence—Hurry Hurry No Speed, by Derrick Zgambo

31. Fiction: Love Beads, by Yaba Badoe

32. Poem: Cinnamon, by Gabeba Baderoon

33. Poem: Covert Sexuality, by Coumba Toure

34. Poem: The Dream in the Next Body, by Gabeba Baderoon

35. Poem: Nature’s Dance, by Olivia Coatzee

36. Poem: Untitled, by Juliane Okot Bitek

37. Reproductive Health and Sexual Rights, by Beth Maina-Ahlberg and Asli Kulane

38. Family Planning, Contraception and Abortion in Islam, by Sa’diyya Shaikh

39. Guilty Until Proven Innocent: Politics versus the Press in Defense of Reproductive Rights in Zambia, by Wilma Nchito

40. Abortion: a Desperate Measure for Lack of Choice, by Salma Maoulidi

41. Poem: The Shedding of Blood, by Unoma Azuah

42. Ode to my Uterus, by Everjoice J. Win

43. Life Stories: Ob/Gyn Experiences, by Sylvia Tamale

44. Journal Excerpts: Reflections on my Journey with my Womb, by Akabotho Kaluwa

45. Masculinities and Male Sexualities, by Kopano Ratele

46. Multiple Meanings of Manhood Among Boys in Ghana, by Akosua Adomako Ampofo and John Boaten

47. “Mombasa Morans”: Embodiment, Sexual Morality and Samburu Men in Kenya, by George Paul Meiu

48. Sexual Orientation and Human Rights: Putting Homophobia on Trial, by Makau Mutua

49. ‘I am Not Tassa, He is Not a Man Like Other Men’: Feminizing Infertility and Masculinizing Fertility in South Nyanza, 1945-60, by Agnes Odinga

50. Poem: The Phantoms of My Opera, by Lombe Annie Mwambwa

51. Poem: The Kiss, by Frank Chipasula

52. Life Story: The Diamond in The G…., by Kipkemboi [jeffrey moses]

53. Unpacking the [Govern]Mentality of African Sexualities, by Stella Nyanzi

54. Sexuality, Gender and Disability in South Africa, by Washeila Sait, Theresa Lorenzo, Melissa Steyn and Mikki van Zyl

55. The Realities of ‘Choice’ in Africa: Implications for Sexuality, Vulnerability, and HIV/AIDS, by Chi-Chi Undie

56. Poem: Wet Towel, by Lombe Mwambwa

57. Interview: Challenges of Sexuality and Aging in a Barren Woman, by Edith Okiria

58. Poem: AIDS Sting(ma)

59. Sexuality, Spirituality & the Supernatural, by Chimaraoke Izugbara

60. ‘African sex is dangerous!’ renegotiating ‘ritual sex’ in Contemporary Masaka District, Uganda, by Stella Nyanzi, Justine Nassimbwa, Vincent Kayizzi and Strivan Kabanda

61. Sangomahood, Abstinence and Celibacy Among Tangoma in Swaziland, by Hebron Ndlovu

62. Creative Methodological/Pedagogical Approaches, by Mansah Prah

63. Interrogating the Link between Gendered Sexualities, Power and Legal Mechanisms: Experiences from the Lecture Room, by Sylvia Tamale

64. Through Zanele Muholi’s Eyes: Re/imagining Ways of Seeing Black Lesbians, by Pumla Gqola

65. A Radical Technique to Teach Sexual Rights, by Dorothy Aken’ova

66. Song: Laabaan Song, by Marame Gueye

In this LINK you can purchase the digital edition of this book.

Categories
Archives Blog Original research

The social vagina: labia elongation and social capital among women in Rwanda.

Cult Health Sex. 2010 Oct;12(7):813-26.LME

The social vagina: labia elongation and social capital among women in Rwanda.

Larsen J

Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Sciences, London, UK. j.kuehnellarsen@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Far from being an individual concern, vaginas are located within complex socio-cultural settings. The acceptability of policies that focus on health-promoting behavioural change is influenced by values regarding normative gender and sexual roles. In Rwanda, the elongation of the labia minorathrough manual manipulation is not an individual act but takes place in social groups and thus cannot be fully understood by focusing one’s attention solely on the individual-related behavioural components but, rather, on the social environment in which it exists. This paper aims to increase knowledge about labia elongation and assesses whether this vaginal practice produce social capital.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Categories
Archives Blog Original research

Rwandan female genital modification: elongation of the Labia minora and the use of local botanical species.

Cult Health Sex. 2008 Feb;10(2):191-204.LME

Rwandan female genital modification: elongation of the Labia minora and the use of local botanical species.

Koster M, Price LL

Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University, Netherlands. marian.koster@wur.nl

ABSTRACT

The elongation of the labia minora is classified as a Type IV female genital mutilation by the World Health Organization. However, the term mutilation carries with it powerful negative connotations. In Rwanda, the elongation of the labia minora and the use of botanicals to do so is meant to increase male and female pleasure. Women regard these practices as a positive force in their lives. This paper aims to assess whether Rwandan vaginal practices should indeed be considered a form of female genital mutilation and whether the botanicals used by women are detrimental to their health. Research was carried out in the northeast of Rwanda over the course of 13 months. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with thirteen informants. Two botanicals applied during stretching sessions were identified as Solanum aculeastrum Dunal and Bidens pilosa L. Both have wide medicinal use and contain demonstrated beneficial bioactive compounds. We suggest that it is therefore more appropriate to describe Rwandan vaginal practices as female genital modification rather than mutilation.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Categories
Archives Blog Original research

Elongation of labia minora in Uganda: including Baganda men in a risk reduction education programme.

Cult Health Sex. 2011 Jan;13(1):45-57. LME

Elongation of labia minora in Uganda: including Baganda men in a risk reduction education programme.

Martínez Pérez G, Namulondo H

Dept. Fisiatry and Nursing, Fac. Health Sciences, Univ. Zaragoza (Spain). gmartinezgabas@gmail.com

Okukyalira ensiko or ‘visiting the bush’ is how, in Uganda, the Baganda people name the practice of elongating the labia minora, which young girls start performing before menarche. As a mandatory rite of passage that identifies membership of the tribe, one of its main purposes is to enhance sexual pleasure for both male and female partners. The conditions in which it is practiced involve certain physical health risks. In this qualitative study carried out in Wakiso district, a semi-structured interview was conducted among 31 Baganda men, in order to understand their perceptions, attitudes and knowledge toward the way in which their daughters practise labia minora elongation. According to our results, men highly value this practice for its capacity to enhance sexual stimulation even though they are aware of its risks. Since genital stretching is likely to endure, the authors discuss the possibility of addressing Baganda men by health workers in an education programme aimed at minimising the risks attached to the procedure and, hence, improving the sexual and reproductive health of Baganda girls.

This article can purchased in this LINK