Tag Archives: Legislation as Topic

The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.

‘Female genital mutilation’ in Europe: Public discourse versus empirical evidence

International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Available online 2 May 2017.

‘Female genital mutilation’ in Europe: Public discourse versus empirical evidence

Johnsdotter SMestre i Mestre RM 

HIGHLIGHTS

• There is a discrepancy between public discourse and empirical evidence regarding ‘female genital mutilation’ in Europe.

• Framing FGM as a widespread social problem in Europe creates myths about activities among immigrant communities.

• An analysis of court cases in Europe shows that the typical European case is FGM performed in Africa.

• Public discourse regarding FGM needs to be challenged in multicultural democracies under the rule of law.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation (Scotland) Act 2005

scotlawThe Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 8) was passed by the Parliament on 26th May 2005 and received Royal Assent on 1st July 2005. This Act is applied in Scotland. In Wales, North Ireland and England the UK 2003 Female Genital Mutilation Act applies.

The text of the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 8) can be accessed in this LINK.

 

Prohibition of Female Circumcision Act 1985

fgmlThe Prohibition of Female Circumcision Act 1985 was an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that made female genital mutilation a crime in the United Kingdom. This Act has been replaced by the UK Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003.

The text of the Prohibition of Female Circumcision Act 1985 can be accessed in this LINK

 

Surgeon acquitted of carrying out female genital mutilation in a prosecution criticised by obstetricians

BMJ. 2015, 350, h703

Surgeon acquitted of carrying out female genital mutilation in a prosecution criticised by obstetricians

Dyer C

EXTRACT

An NHS trainee obstetrician who faced the first prosecution in the United Kingdom for female genital mutilation has been acquitted after the jury deliberated for less than half an hour.

Dhanuson Dharmasena, then a junior registrar in obstetrics and gynaecology at the Whittington Hospital in north London, was accused of reinfibulating a Somali woman by sewing her labia together after the birth of her first child in 2012. But he told the jury that he had put only a small suture at the top of a cut he had made to deliver the baby, to stop bleeding, in an emergency situation.

The verdict of not guilty came after Mr Justice Sweeney, who presided over the 13 day trial at Southwark Crown Court, told the jury in his summing up that they would have to consider whether the doctor had been made a “scapegoat” …

This article can be accessed in this LINK

 

Female genital cutting

J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014 Aug;36(8):671-2.FREE

Female genital cutting

Kotaska A, Avery L

Comment in J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014 Aug;36(8):672.

EXTRACT

Female genital cutting (FGC) is unethical. It causes physical, psychological, and emotional harm, and is rarely performed with consent. SOGC Clinical Practice Guideline no. 299 on FGC outlines this argument well.1 However, re-infibulation is inappropriately bundled together with FGC. Re-infibulation is fundamentally different, surgically and ethically, from FGC. The two need to be examined independently, particularly since the guideline prohibits re-infibulation…

This article can be accessed in this LINK

The NHS displays absurd double standards on circumcision.

Nurs Stand. 2014 Jun 4;28(40):35. doi: 10.7748/ns.28.40.35.s46.

The NHS displays absurd double standards on circumcision.

Clark C.

I support the law in the UK against female genital mutilation (FGM) and the fact that staff in acute hospitals are now mandated to record information on a national database about women and children who have undergone FGM (News May 28).

There is no LINK to view this article online.

Doctor one of two people to face first UK prosecutions for female genital mutilation.

BMJ. 2014 Mar 23;348:g2313. doi: 10.1136/bmj.g2313.

Doctor one of two people to face first UK prosecutions for female genital mutilation.

Kmietowicz Z.

EXTRACT

A doctor from the Whittington Hospital in north London and another man will be the first people to face charges of female genital mutilation in the United Kingdom when they appear in court next month.

The Crown Prosecution Service announced on 21 March that Dhanoun Dharmasena allegedly carried out the procedure on a woman after she gave birth in November 2012. The woman had also undergone female genital mutilation on a previous occasion….

This article can be accessed in this LINK

First UK prosecution for female genital mutilation raises concerns among doctors.

BMJ. 2014 Mar 27;348:g2424. doi: 10.1136/bmj.g2424.

First UK prosecution for female genital mutilation raises concerns among doctors.

Dyer C.

EXTRACT

Obstetricians have said that the first prosecution for female genital mutilation (FGM) in the United Kingdom could lead doctors to fear criminal charges if they carry out repairs to stop post-birth bleeding in women who have previously been subjected to the illegal procedure, which has been a specific crime in the UK since 1985.

The first prosecution for the offence has been launched against a doctor who, the Crown Prosecution Service alleges, “repaired FGM that had previously been performed on the patient, allegedly carrying out FGM himself,”1 after a patient had given birth…

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Doctors are key to securing the UK’s first conviction for female genital mutilation, say campaigners.

BMJ. 2013 Nov 5;347:f6672. doi: 10.1136/bmj.f6672.

Doctors are key to securing the UK’s first conviction for female genital mutilation, say campaigners.

Hives-Wood S.

EXTRACT

Doctors who find evidence of female genital mutilation (FGM) should treat it as a crime and report it to police, a coalition of health organisations has recommended.

The coalition said that a government funded awareness strategy was needed, similar to that launched in the 1990s to tackle HIV, to prevent the genital mutilation of young girls. Doctors and other health and care professionals should be held responsible for monitoring female genital mutilation and treating it as child abuse.

This article can be accessed in this LINK