Tag Archives: Liability/legal

Female genital mutilation: implications for clinical practice

Br J Nurs. 2017 Oct 12;26(18):S22-S27. doi: 10.12968/bjon.2017.26.18.S22.

Female genital mutilation: implications for clinical practice

von Rège I, Campion D

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is an established cultural practice in over 30 countries. It has no health benefits, carries a high risk of physical and psychological harm, and is illegal in many countries including the UK. A sensitive approach is required, both in the management of complications and prevention of this practice. This article discusses the prevalence and classification of FGM, and offers practical advice to nurses and midwives involved in general and obstetric care. Legal aspects, including safeguarding responsibilities and the mandatory duty to report FGM in England and Wales, are outlined.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Circumcision and excision: Towards a non-law of bioethics?

J Int Bioethique. 2015 Jul;26(3):63-75, 263.

Circumcision and excision: Towards a non-law of bioethics? [Article in French]

Delage PJ

ABSTRACT

This article defines the practices of circumcision and excision, and studies their foundations. Then, it considers some of the conflicts (of rights, laws and cultures) inherent to these practices. Finally, it suggests that the solution to these conflicts may not lie in the law, but in a non-law of bioethics.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel

Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2016 Jul;77(7):419-23. doi: 10.12968/hmed.2016.77.7.419.

Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel.

Cropp G, Armstrong J

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation is illegal. It is now mandatory for health-care professionals to report female genital mutilation to the police. Professionals caring for women and girls of all ages must understand how female genital mutilation presents, and what action to take.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Royal college strengthens its guideline on female genital mutilation

BMJ. 2015 Jul 9;351:h3709. doi: 10.1136/bmj.h3709.

Royal college strengthens its guideline on female genital mutilation.

Torjesen I

EXTRACT

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has revised its guideline on female genital mutilation to clarify healthcare professionals’ legal responsibilities, the requirements to notify cases, and the management of women who have undergone mutilation who are pregnant or giving birth.

The update comes after the first attempted UK prosecution of a doctor for female genital mutilation. Dhanuson Dharmasena, a trainee registrar in obstetrics and gynaecology at the Whittington Hospital in north London, was acquitted earlier this year...

This article can be accessed in this LINK

The Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003: an overview for district nurses.

Br J Community Nurs. 2009 Feb;14(2):86-9.

The Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003: an overview for district nurses.

Griffith R, Tengnah C.

School of Health Sciences, Swansea University, UK. richard.griffith@swan.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM) includes procedures that intentionally alter or injure female genital organs for non-medical reasons. An estimated 100 to 140 million girls and women worldwide are currently living with the consequences of FGM with some three million girls at risk in Africa every year. The procedure has no health benefits and can cause severe bleeding and continence problems, and later, potential childbirth complications and newborn deaths. FGM is internationally recognized as a violation of one’s human rights (World Health Organisation, 2008). In the UK it is a procedure outlawed by the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003.

There is no LINK to view this article online.