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Female genital mutilation and transcultural nursing: adaptation of the Rising Sun Model

Contemp Nurse. 2016 Nov 29:1-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital mutilation and transcultural nursing: adaptation of the Rising Sun Model.

Jiménez-Ruiz I, Almansa Martínez P

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a widespread practice mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa and is considered an affront on the dignity and health of women and young girls.

OBJECTIVES: To establish a theoretical model, inspired by that of Madeleine Leininger, in order to examine the reasonings used to justify FGM.

METHODS: Theorization through bibliographic review.

Resuts and conclusions: The factors used to justify this act are diverse and convert the tradition into a form of cultural care. From this viewpoint, nurses might evaluate the supposed justifications via the Rising Sun Model in order to redirect such a practice through nursing interventions such as: research into propagating factors, sensitizing through hindering factors or health education, highlighting the contradictions existent in the justification of FGM.

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Aproximation to the ablation/female genital mutilation (A/FGM) from the transcultural nursing. A bibliographical revision.

Enferm. glob. vol.11 no.28 Murcia oct. 2012FREE

Aproximation to the ablation/female genital mutilation (A/FGM) from the transcultural nursing. A bibliographical revision. (Article in Spanish)

Jiménez Ruiz I. Almansa Martínez P, Pastor Bravo MM, Pina Roche F

ABSTRACT

Objective: Analysing the argumentations in favour to the Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) with the intention to know and understand the complex and subjective reality of this practice.  Material and method: bibliographical search and revision on the net in order to accessing Web directories of organizations and the main health sciences data bases. Results: The analysis of the biography contributes with a big quantity of information regarding the supportiveness of this practice and the complications derived from it, clarifying the complex situations involved in its perpetuation. Conclusions: The FGM is understood as a cultural care of women determined by socio-cultural, hygienic-aesthetic, religious-spiritual and sexual factors among others related with health. In this way, a wide range of secondary complications to FGM have been described.

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Contextualization of female genital mutilation since nursing. Analysis videographic

Enferm. glob. vol.11 no.25 Murcia Ene. 2012FREE

Contextualization of female genital mutilation since nursing. Analysis videographic. (Article in Spanish)

Pastor Bravo, MM, Almansa Martínez P, Ballesteros Meseguer C, Pastor Rodríguez JD

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this paper is to analize the audiovisual documents relating to the ritual of the female genital mutilation.
Material and method: pursuit and review of the video footage that give us information about the female genital mutilation in context, and be a primary source of information.
Results: The anlysis of the video footage obtained allows us to identify a large amount of data in order to study the female genital mutilation in context. To analyze the collected information 10 categories have been stablished.
Conclusion: The visual documents are a essential source of research for the analysis of the female genital mutilation ritual; they are a tool to consider in the training of health professionals in this area, which affects health of women and immigrant children. The knowledge obtained due to this review can be used in order to approach in a cultural way the female genital mutilation.

Key words: female genital mutilation; female circumcision; ablation; nursing; analysis of audiovisual; qualitative study.

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“They get a C-section…they gonna die”: Somali women’s fears of obstetrical interventions in the United States.

J Transcult Nurs. 2010 Jul;21(3):220-7. doi: 10.1177/1043659609358780.

“They get a C-section…they gonna die”: Somali women’s fears of obstetrical interventions in the United States.

Brown E, Carroll J, Fogarty C, Holt C.

University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14620, USA. elizabeth_brown@urmc.rochester.edu

ABSTRACT

The authors explore sources of resistance to common prenatal and obstetrical interventions among 34 Somali resettled adult women in Rochester, New York. Results of individual interviews and focus groups with these women revealed aversion to or outright fear of cesarean sections because of fear of death and substantial resistance regarding other obstetrical interventions. Because Somali women expressed resistance to many common U.S. prenatal/obstetrical care practices, educating health professionals about Somali women’s fears and educating Somali women about common obstetrical practices are both necessary to improve maternity care for non-Bantu and Bantu Somali women.

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Comparative Study of Meanings, Beliefs, and Practices of Female Circumcision Among Three Nigerian Tribes in the United States and Nigeria

J Transcult Nurs. April 2004 15: 103-113

Comparative Study of Meanings, Beliefs, and Practices of Female Circumcision Among Three Nigerian Tribes in the United States and Nigeria

Prisca O. Anuforo, Lola Oyedele, Dula F. Pacquiao, Kean University

ABSTRACT

The study was conducted to gain insight into the meanings, beliefs, and practices of female circumcision among three Nigerian tribes in the United States and Nigeria. Participant-observations occurred in three sites in Nigeria (Ibadan, Lagos, and Owerri) and in Essex County, New Jersey (Newark, Irvington, and East Orange). A total of 50 informants included adult males and females from the three main Nigerian ethnic tribes: Igbo, Yoruba, and Hausa. Leininger’s culture care theory of diversity and universality was the study framework. Findings revealed existence of similarities and differences in the cultural meanings, beliefs, and practices among the tribes. Religion, education, and occupation were significant factors influencing informants’ attitudes toward continuation of the practice. Government-sponsored public education and influence by the media were found to increase informants’ awareness of complications of female circumcision. Changes in attitudes toward the practice and use of alternative practices were evident.

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Female genital mutilation: applications of nursing theory for clinical care

Nurse Pract. 2011 Apr;36(4):45-50.

Female genital mutilation: applications of nursing theory for clinical care.

Burke E.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a continuing practice among some immigrant groups. As mobility increases among this population, NPs in primary care will continue to see women who have experienced FGM. NPs must gain a better understanding of the practice in order to provide optimal, culturally appropriate clinical care.

This article can be purchased in this LINK