Tag Archives: Motivation

Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.

Understanding the motivations of health-care providers in performing female genital mutilation: an integrative review of the literature.

FREEReprod Health. 2017 Mar 23;14(1):46. doi: 10.1186/s12978-017-0306-5.

Understanding the motivations of health-care providers in performing female genital mutilation: an integrative review of the literature.

Doucet MH, Pallitto C, Groleau D.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a traditional harmful practice that can cause severe physical and psychological damages to girls and women. Increasingly, trained health-care providers carry out the practice at the request of families. It is important to understand the motivations of providers in order to reduce the medicalization of FGM. This integrative review identifies, appraises and summarizes qualitative and quantitative literature exploring the factors that are associated with the medicalization of FGM and/or re-infibulation. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted in PubMed, CINAHL and grey literature databases. Hand searches of identified studies were also examined. The “CASP Qualitative Research Checklist” and the “STROBE Statement” were used to assess the methodological quality of the qualitative and quantitative studies respectively. A total of 354 articles were reviewed for inclusion. RESULTS: Fourteen (14) studies, conducted in countries where FGM is largely practiced as well as in countries hosting migrants from these regions, were included. The main findings about the motivations of health-care providers to practice FGM were: (1) the belief that performing FGM would be less harmful for girls or women than the procedure being performed by a traditional practitioner (the so-called “harm reduction” perspective); (2) the belief that the practice was justified for cultural reasons; (3) the financial gains of performing the procedure; (4) responding to requests of the community or feeling pressured by the community to perform FGM. The main reasons given by health-care providers for not performing FGM were that they (1) are concerned about the risks that FGM can cause for girls’ and women’s health; (2) are preoccupied by the legal sanctions that might result from performing FGM; and (3) consider FGM to be a “bad practice”. CONCLUSION: The findings of this review can inform public health program planners, policy makers and researchers to adapt or create strategies to end medicalization of FGM in countries with high prevalence of this practice, as well as in countries hosting immigrants from these regions. Given the methodological limitations in the included studies, it is clear that more robust in-depth qualitative studies are needed, in order to better tackle the complexity of this phenomenon and contribute to eradicating FGM throughout the world.

This article is available in this LINK

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Will It Continue?

J Sex Med. 2014 Aug 14. doi: 10.1111/jsm.12655. [Epub ahead of print]

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Will It Continue?

Mohammed GF, Hassan MM, Eyada MM.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a prevalent, deeply rooted traditional practice in Egypt. AIMS: Specification of the motives behind the continuation of FGM/C in Egyptian community and evaluation of the sexual function in women with FGM/C.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study, involved 2,106 sexually active female participants with FGM/C. Full history-taking and general examination to evaluate the type of FGM/C were conducted. Sexual function was assessed by using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Enumerate and specify the motivational factors and its percent among the participants. The correlation between FGM/C and FSFI domain scores was done with Pearson’s correlation.

RESULTS: Tradition, cleanliness, and virginity were the most common motives empowering the continuation of FGM/C (100%), followed by men’s wish, esthetic factors, marriage, and religion factors (45.2-100%). Type I FGM/C was the most common, followed by type II. There was only negative correlation between the type II FGM/C and sexual satisfaction. No statistically significant difference between type I and non-FGM/C was found.

CONCLUSIONS: FGM/C remains high. A variety of socio-cultural myths, religious misbelievers, and hygienic and esthetic concerns were behind the FGM/C. Overall, a large proportion of the participants supported the continuation of FGM/C in spite of adverse effect and sexual dysfunction associated with FGM/C.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

The Practice of Puxa-Puxa among Mozambican Women: A Systematic Inventory of Motives.

J Sex Res. 2013 Aug 7. [Epub ahead of print] LME

The Practice of Puxa-Puxa among Mozambican Women: A Systematic Inventory of Motives.

Vera Cruz G, Mullet E.

Department of Psychology, Eduardo Mondlane University.

ABSTRACT

Puxa-puxa is the elongation of the labia minora of the genital organs. It is one of the most widespread genital practices among women in Mozambique, and the practice seems to be specific to this country. The motives underlying this practice and its abandonment were examined in a theory-driven way. A total of 616 women currently living in the provinces of Maputo, Zambezia, and Nampula, aged 18 to 62, were presented with one of two questionnaires that contained items about possible motives for practicing puxa-puxa or possible motives for not practicing it. Seven separable motives for practicing puxa-puxa were found, and the most highly rated were “Having a satisfying sexual life”; “Satisfying my sexual partner”; and “Gaining self-control.” Five separable motives for not practicing puxa-puxa were found, and the most highly rated were “Disliking a painful practice”; “Affirming one’s value as a person”; and “Avoiding contamination.” The main findings of the study are that the practice of puxa-puxa is associated with deep psychological motives common to most women in most cultures, namely having a satisfying sexual life with a reliable partner, creating the conditions for having children, and being able to care for them. The abandonment of this practice is largely the result of personal decisions, which are not taken under constraint and which are not exclusively taken from fear of illness.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Cosmetic clitoridectomy in a 33-year-old woman

Arch Sex Behav. 2012 Jun;41(3):725-30. Epub 2011 Aug 12.

Cosmetic clitoridectomy in a 33-year-old woman.

Veale D, Daniels J.

NIHR Specialist Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and The Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, 99 Denmark Hill, London, SE5 8AZ, UK. David.Veale@kcl.ac.uk

Comment in
Arch Sex Behav. 2012 Jun;41(3):735-6.
Arch Sex Behav. 2012 Jun;41(3):731-4.

ABSTRACT

The Female Genital Mutilation Act (2003) in England allows for mental health exceptions for cosmetic surgery resulting from perceived abnormality. Similar legislation exists in other countries. There are no reported cases of clitoridectomy for cosmetic reasons or any discussion in the literature of mental health exceptions to the Act. This is a single case report on a 33-year-old married, heterosexual woman who had already had a cosmetic labiaplasty and was seeking a clitoridectomy for aesthetic reasons. At assessment, there were no psychiatric contra-indications or unrealistic expectations and the patient proceeded with a clitoridectomy. At 9 and 22 months follow-up, she was reassessed and was very pleased with the outcome. There were improvements in the satisfaction with her genital appearance, sexual satisfaction, and quality of life related to body image. Assessments for cosmetic clitoridectomy will continue to be rare, but this case may provide some guidance for practitioners who are confronted with such requests for body modification. However there remains only limited understanding of the motivation for such a request.

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