Tag Archives: Nurse-Patient Relations

Interaction between the patient and nurse.

Female genital mutilation and cutting: a systematic literature review of health professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and clinical practice

BMC Int Health Hum Rights. 2015 Dec 10;15(1):32. doi: 10.1186/s12914-015-0070-y.

Female genital mutilation and cutting: a systematic literature review of health professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and clinical practice

Zurynski Y, Sureshkumar P, Phu A, Elliott E

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that 100-140 million girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C). FGM/C is an ancient cultural practice prevalent in 26 countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. With increased immigration, health professionals in high income countries including UK, Europe, North America and Australia care for women and girls with FGM/C. FGM/C is relevant to paediatric practice as it is usually performed in children, however, health professionals’ knowledge, clinical practice, and attitudes to FGM/C have not been systematically described. We aimed to conduct a systematic review of the literature to address this gap.

METHODS: The review was conducted according to guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and registered with the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (CRD42015015540, http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/ ). Articles published in English 2000-2014 which used quantitative methods were reviewed.

RESULTS: Of 159 unique articles, 18 met inclusion criteria. The methodological quality was poor – six studies met seven of the eight quality criteria. Study participants included mainly obstetricians, gynaecologists and midwives (15 studies). We found no papers that studied paediatricians specifically, but two papers reported on subgroups of paediatricians within a mixed sample of health professionals. The 18 articles covered 13 different countries: eight from Africa and 10 from high income countries. Most health professionals were aware of the practice of FGM/C, but few correctly identified the four FGM/C categories defined by WHO. Knowledge about FGM/C legislation varied: 25 % of professionals in a Sudanese study, 46 % of Belgian labour ward staff and 94 % of health professionals from the UK knew that FGM/C was illegal in their country. Health professionals from high income countries had cared for women or girls with FGM/C. The need to report children with FGM/C, or at risk of FGM/C, to child protection authorities was mentioned by only two studies.

CONCLUSION: Further research is needed to determine health professionals’ attitudes, knowledge and practice to support the development of educational materials and policy to raise awareness and to prevent this harmful practice.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Nursing Care of Women Who Have Undergone Genital Cutting

Nurs Womens Health. 2015 Oct;19(5):445-9. doi: 10.1111/1751-486X.12237.

Nursing Care of Women Who Have Undergone Genital Cutting

Tilley DS

ABSTRACT

Female genital cutting (FGC), commonly called female genital mutilation, affects
millions of women but is poorly understood by many health care providers. FGC
procedures intentionally alter the female genital organs for nonmedical reasons
and include partial or total removal of female genital organs. These procedures,
which have no medical value, are usually done between birth and puberty. Health
consequences vary in severity but can be devastating. Women who have experienced
FGC may be reluctant to seek health care or to disclose their condition to
providers. Suggestions for culturally competent care of women who have
experienced FGC are outlined, focusing on understanding the cultural beliefs and
values of women who have undergone these procedures and providing informed and
sensitive care.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

FGM: dispelling the myths; exploring the facts

Pract Midwife. 2015 Jul-Aug;18(7):18-20.

FGM: dispelling the myths; exploring the facts.

Dixon-Wright R.

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation is a process that affects our practice. It is becoming more common in our ever-diversifying population and therefore education is vitally important to be able to put robust care plans in place. Understanding the psychological and physical difficulties experienced by women of childbearing age can help us to improve the care that we, as maternity healthcare professionals, can deliver. Looking at current research, this article examines some of the presumed cultural and societal beliefs behind the procedure and highlights some new evidence that change is welcomed by women and their families.

There is no LINK to view this article online.

‘Staff fear raising the alarm on FGM’.

Nurs Stand. 2014 Jun 3;28(39):11. doi: 10.7748/ns.28.39.11.s12.

‘Staff fear raising the alarm on FGM’.

[No authors listed]

ABSTRACT

Nurses can play a vital role in eradicating female genital mutilation–but some may be afraid to report it for fear of being seen as culturally insensitive, says a senior nurse academic.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation and visual checks on schoolgirls.

Nurs Stand. 2013 Oct 2;28(5):34. doi: 10.7748/ns2013.10.28.5.34.s45.

Female genital mutilation and visual checks on schoolgirls.

Hopkins C.

EXTRACT

I am disappointed in the sweeping statements made by Bridget Ryan (Letters September 11) and her views about how to deal with and prevent female genital mutilation (FGM).

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Increasing certified nurse-midwives’ confidence in managing the obstetric care of women with female genital mutilation/cutting.

J Midwifery Womens Health. 2013 Jul;58(4):451-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1542-2011.2012.00262.x.

Increasing certified nurse-midwives’ confidence in managing the obstetric care of women with female genital mutilation/cutting.

Jacoby SD, Smith A.

INTRODUCTION: In response to an increase in the number of women who immigrate to the United States from countries that practice female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C; infibulation), US clinicians can expand their knowledge and increase confidence in caring for women who have experienced infibulation. This article describes a comprehensive education program on FGM/C and the results of a pilot study that examined its effect on midwives’ confidence in caring for women with infibulation.

METHODS: An education program was developed that included didactic information, case studies, a cultural roundtable, and a hands-on skills laboratory of deinfibulation and repair. Eleven certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) participated in this pilot study. Participants completed a measure-of-confidence survey tool before and after the education intervention.

RESULTS: Participants reported increased confidence in their ability to provide culturally competent care to immigrant women with infibulation when comparisons of preeducation and posteducation survey confidence logs were completed.

DISCUSSION: Following the education program and the knowledge gained from it, these midwives were more confident about their ability to perform anterior episiotomy and to deliver necessary care to women with FGM/C in a culturally competent context. This education program should be expanded as more women who have experienced infibulation immigrate to the United States.

This article can be accessed in this LINK.

The encounters that rupture the myth: contradictions in midwives´descriptions and explanations of circumcised women immigrants´sexuality

Health Care Women Int. 2004 25(8): 743-760. 10.1080/07399330490475593

The encounters that rupture the myth: contradictions in midwives´descriptions and explanations of circumcised women immigrants´sexuality

Leval A, Widmark C, Tishelman C, Ahlberg BM

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to analyze how Swedish midwives (n = 26) discuss sexuality in circumcised African women patients. In focus groups and interviews, discussions concentrated on care provided to circumcised women, training received for this care, and midwives’ perceptions of female circumcision. An analytic expansion was performed for discussions pertaining to sexuality and gender roles. Results from the analysis show the following: (1) ethnocentric projections of sexuality; (2) a knowledge paradox regarding circumcision and sexuality; (3) the view of the powerless circumcised women; and (4) the fact that maternity wards function as meeting places between gender and culture where the encounters with men allow masculine hegemonic norms to be ruptured. We conclude that an increased understanding of cultural epistemology is needed to ensure quality care. The encounters that take place in obstetrical care situations can provide a space where gender and culture as prescribed norms can be questioned.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

The experiences of African women giving birth in Brisbane, Australia.

Health Care Women Int. 2010 May;31(5):458-72. doi: 10.1080/07399330903548928.

The experiences of African women giving birth in Brisbane, Australia.

Murray L, Windsor C, Parker E, Tewfik O.

School of Public Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane, Australia. linda.murray@qut.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Our purpose in this research was to uncover first-person descriptions of the birth experiences of African refugee women in Brisbane, Australia, and to explore the common themes that emerged from their experiences. We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 African refugees who had given birth in Brisbane. Essences universal to childbirth such as pain, control, and experiences of caregivers featured prominently in participants’ descriptions of their experiences. Their experiences, however, were further overshadowed by issues such as language barriers, the refugee experience, female genital mutilation (FGM), and encounters with health services with limited cultural competence.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Swedish Health Care Providers’ Experience and Knowledge of Female Genital Cutting

Health Care for Women International. 2006 (27)8709-722

Swedish Health Care Providers’ Experience and Knowledge of Female Genital Cutting

Leila Tamaddon, Sara Johnsdotter, Jerker Liljestrand &Birgitta Essén

ABSTRACT

We sought to evaluate the experiences and knowledge of health care providers in Sweden regarding female genital cutting (FGC) as a health issue. Questionnaires (n = 2,707) were sent to providers in four major cities in Sweden and evaluated by means of descriptive statistics. Twenty-eight percent (n = 769/2,707) responded, of whom 60% had seen such patients. Seven providers, including 2 pediatricians, were suspicious of patients with signs of recent genital cutting. Ten percent had been asked to perform reinfibulation after delivery. Thirty-eight providers had received inquiries about the possibility of performing FGC in Sweden.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Female genital mutilation: applications of nursing theory for clinical care

Nurse Pract. 2011 Apr;36(4):45-50.

Female genital mutilation: applications of nursing theory for clinical care.

Burke E.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a continuing practice among some immigrant groups. As mobility increases among this population, NPs in primary care will continue to see women who have experienced FGM. NPs must gain a better understanding of the practice in order to provide optimal, culturally appropriate clinical care.

This article can be purchased in this LINK