Tag Archives: Obstetric Labor Complications

Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.

Deinfibulation for preventing or treating complications in women living with type III female genital mutilation: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

FREEInt J Gynaecol Obstet. 2017 Feb;136 Suppl 1:13-20. doi: 10.1002/ijgo.12056.

Deinfibulation for preventing or treating complications in women living with type III female genital mutilation: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Okusanya BO, Oduwole O, Nwachuku N, Meremikwu MM.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Deinfibulation is a surgical procedure carried out to re-open the vaginal introitus of women living with type III female genital mutilation (FGM). OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of deinfibulation on gynecologic or obstetric outcomes by comparing women who were deinfibulated with women with type III FGM or women without FGM. SEARCH STRATEGY: Major databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Scopus were searched until August 2015. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included nonrandomized studies that compared obstetric outcomes of women with deinfibulation, type III FGM (not deinfibulated during labor), and no FGM. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality of evidence was determined following the GRADE methodology. Summary measures were calculated using odds ratios at 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: We found no randomized controlled trials. We included four case-control studies. The quality of evidence was very low. Compared with women with type III FGM at delivery, deinfibulated women had a significant reduction in the risk of having a cesarean delivery or postpartum hemorrhage. Compared with women without FGM, deinfibulated women had a similar risk of episiotomy, cesarean delivery, vaginal lacerations, postpartum hemorrhage, and blood loss at vaginal delivery. The length of second stage of labor, mean maternal hospital stay, and Apgar scores less than 7 were also comparable. CONCLUSIONS: Low-quality evidence suggests deinfibulation improves birth outcomes for women with type III FGM.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Acquired Clitoromegaly: A Gynaecological Problem or an Obstetric Complication?

FREEJ Clin Diagn Res. 2016 Dec;10(12):QD10-QD11. doi: 10.7860/JCDR/2016/23212.9072. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Acquired Clitoromegaly: A Gynaecological Problem or an Obstetric Complication?

Gupta M, Saini V, Poddar A, Kumari S, Maitra A.

ABSTRACT

Acquired non-hormonal clitoromegaly is a rare condition and is due to benign or malignant tumours and sometimes idiopathic. Few cases of clitoral abscesses have been reported after female circumcision. We hereby report a case of clitoral abscess causing acquired clitoromegaly following an obstetrical surgery.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Powerlessness, Normalization, and Resistance: A Foucauldian Discourse Analysis of Women’s Narratives On Obstetric Fistula in Eastern Sudan.

Qual Health Res. 2017 Oct;27(12):1828-1841. doi: 10.1177/1049732317720423. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

Powerlessness, Normalization, and Resistance: A Foucauldian Discourse Analysis of Women’s Narratives On Obstetric Fistula in Eastern Sudan.

Hamed S, Ahlberg BM, Trenholm J.

ABSTRACT

Eastern Sudan has high prevalence of female circumcision and child marriage constituting a risk for developing obstetric fistula. Few studies have examined gender roles’ relation with obstetric fistula in Sudan. To explore the associated power-relations that may put women at increased risk for developing obstetric fistula, we conducted nine interviews with women living with obstetric fistula in Kassala in eastern Sudan. Using a Foucauldian discourse analysis, we identified three discourses: powerlessness, normalization, and covert resistance. Existing power-relations between the women and other societal members revealed their internalization of social norms as absolute truth, and influenced their status and decision-making power in regard to circumcision, early marriage, and other transformative decisions as well as women’s general behaviors. The women showed subtle resistance to these norms and the harassment they encountered because of their fistula. These findings suggest that a more in-depth contextual assessment could benefit future maternal health interventions.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Obstetric fistula and sociocultural practices in Hausa community of Northern Nigeria.

Women Birth. 2017 Mar 7. pii: S1871-5192(17)30076-8. doi: 10.1016/j.wombi.2017.02.009. [Epub ahead of print]

Obstetric fistula and sociocultural practices in Hausa community of Northern Nigeria.

Amodu OC, Salami B, Richter S.

ABSTRACT 

BACKGROUND: Obstetric Fistula is a childbirth injury that disproportionately affects women in sub-Saharan Africa. Although poverty plays an important role in perpetuating obstetric fistula, sociocultural practices has a significant influence on susceptibility to the condition. AIM: This paper aims to explore narratives in the literature on obstetric fistula in the context of Hausa ethno-lingual community of Northern Nigeria and the potential role of nurses and midwives in addressing obstetric fistula. DISCUSSION: Three major cultural practices predispose Hausa women to obstetric fistula: early marriages and early child bearing; unskilled birth attendance and female circumcision and sociocultural constraints to healthcare access for women during childbirth. There is a failure to implement the International rights of the girl child in Nigeria which makes early child marriage persist. The Hausa tradition constrains the decision making power of women for seeking health care during childbirth. In addition, there is a shortage of nurses and midwives to provide healthcare service to women during childbirth. CONCLUSION: To improve health access for women, there is a need to increase political commitment and budget for health human resource distribution to underserved areas in the Hausa community. There is also a need to advance power and voice of women to resist oppressive traditions and to provide them with empowerment opportunities to improve their social status. The practice of traditional birth attendants can be regulated and the primary health care services strengthened.

This article is available in this LINK

Injured bodies, damaged lives: experiences and narratives of Kenyan women with obstetric fistula and Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting.

FREEReprod Health. 2017 Mar 14;14(1):38. doi: 10.1186/s12978-017-0300-y.

Injured bodies, damaged lives: experiences and narratives of Kenyan women with obstetric fistula and Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting.

Mwanri L, Gatwiri GJ.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is well acknowledged that Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C/C) leads to medical, psychological and sociocultural sequels. Over 200 million cases of FGM/C exist globally, and in Kenya alone, a total of 12,418,000 (28%) of women have undergone FGM/C, making the practice not only a significant national, but also a global health catastrophe. FGM/C is rooted in patriarchal and traditional cultures as a communal experience signifying a transition from girlhood to womanhood. The conversations surrounding FGM/C have been complicated by the involvement of women themselves in perpetuating the practice. METHODS: A qualitative inquiry employing face-to-face, one-on-one, in-depth semi-structured interviews was used in a study that included 30 women living with obstetric fistulas in Kenya. Using the Social Network Framework and a feminist analysis we present stories of Kenyan women who had developed obstetric fistulas following prolonged and obstructed childbirth. RESULTS: Of the 30 participants, three women reported that health care workers informed them that FGM/C was one of the contributing factors to their prolonged and obstructed childbirth. They reported serious obstetric complications including: the development of obstetric fistulas, lowered libido, poor quality of life and maternal and child health outcomes, including death. Fistula and subsequent loss of bodily functionalities such as uncontrollable leakage of body wastes, was reported by the women to result in rejection by spouses, families, friends and communities. Rejection further led to depression, loss of work, increased sense of apathy, lowered self-esteem and image, as well as loss of identity and communal sociocultural cohesion. CONCLUSION: FGM/C is practised in traditional, patriarchal communities across Africa. Although the practice aims to bind community members and to celebrate a rite of passage; it may lead to harmful health and social consequences. Some women with fistula report their fistula was caused by FGM/C. Concerted efforts which embrace feminist understandings of society, as well as multi-sectoral, multidisciplinary and community development approaches need to be employed to address FGM/C, and to possibly reduce cases of obstetric fistulas in Kenya and beyond. Both government and non-government organisations need to be involved in making legislative, gender sensitive policies that protect women from FGM/C. In addition, the policy makers need to be in the front line to improve the lives of women who endured the consequences of FGM/C.

This article is available in this LINK

Female genital mutilation/cutting in Africa

FREETransl Androl Urol. 2017 Apr;6(2):138-148. doi: 10.21037/tau.2016.12.01.

Female genital mutilation/cutting in Africa

Odukogbe AA, Afolabi BB, Bello OO, Adeyanju AS

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a traditional practice in which the external female genitalia is partially or totally incised or excised for a non-therapeutic reason, usually without the consent of the individual. FGM/C is common in Africa with varying prevalence in different countries, though the incidence is reducing because it is considered a human rights issue with tremendous advocacy for its elimination by mainly nongovernmental organizations. It is mainly underreported in many countries in Africa especially where it has been declared illegal. FGM/C is often performed by a nonmedical practitioner with the aim of fulfilling religious or cultural rites and sometimes for economic benefits with the resultant acute, intermediate and late complications. It is sometimes performed by medical practitioners when it is speciously believed that its medicalization reduces the complications associated with the practice. The sensitivity of FGM/C is amplified when compared to male circumcision and voluntary alterations of the female external genitalia like piercing and tattooing as similar practices. The magnitude of the physical and psychosocial consequences of FGM/C outweighs the presumed benefits of the procedures highlighting the need for improvement of the multiple preventive measures by all the stakeholders and in all the sectors.

This article is available in this LINK

Are obstetric outcomes affected by female genital mutilation?

Int Urogynecol J. 2017 Sep 9. doi: 10.1007/s00192-017-3466-5. [Epub ahead of
print]

Are obstetric outcomes affected by female genital mutilation?

Balachandran AA, Duvalla S, Sultan AH, Thakar R

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Female genital mutilation (FGM) has been associated with adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes, such as postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), perineal trauma, genital fistulae, obstructed labour and stillbirth. The prevalence of FGM has increased in the UK over the last decade. There are currently no studies available that have explored the obstetric impact of FGM in the UK. The aim of our study was to investigate the obstetric and neonatal outcomes of women with FGM when compared with the general population. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective case-control study of consecutive pregnant women with FGM over a 5-year period between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Each woman with FGM was matched for age, ethnicity, parity and gestation with subsequent patients without FGM (control cohort) over the same 5-year period. Outcomes assessed were mode of delivery, duration of labour, estimated blood loss, analgaesia, perineal trauma and foetal outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 242 eligible women (121 FGM, 121 control) were identified for the study. There was a significant increase in the use of episiotomy in the FGM group (p = 0.009) and a significant increase in minor PPH in the control group during caesarean sections (p = 0.0001). There were no differences in all other obstetric and neonatal parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In our unit, FGM was not associated with an increased incidence of adverse obstetric and foetal morbidity or mortality.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Episiotomy and obstetric outcomes among women living with type 3 female genital mutilation: a secondary analysis

Reprod Health. 2016 Oct 10;13(1):131.FREE

Episiotomy and obstetric outcomes among women living with type 3 female genital mutilation: a secondary analysis.

Rodriguez MI, Seuc A, Say L, Hindin MJ

BACKGROUND: To investigate the association between type of episiotomy and obstetric outcomes among 6,187 women with type 3 Female Genital Mutilation (FGM).

METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of women presenting in labor to 28 obstetric centres in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Sudan between November 2001 and March 2003. Data were analysed using cross tabulations and multivariable logistic regression to determine if type of episiotomy by FGM classification had a significant impact on key maternal outcomes. Our main outcome measures were anal sphincter tears, intrapartum blood loss requiring an intervention, and postpartum haemorrhage.

RESULTS: Type of episiotomy performed varied significantly by FGM status. Among women without FGM, the most common type of episiotomy performed was posterior lateral (25.4 %). The prevalence of the most extensive type of episiotomy, anterior and posterior lateral episiotomy increased with type of FGM. Among women without FGM, 0.4 % had this type of episiotomy. This increased to 0.6 % for women with FGM Types 1, 2 or 4 and to 54.6 % of all women delivering vaginally with FGM Type 3. After adjustment, women with an anterior episiotomy, (AOR = 0.15 95 %; CI 0.06-0.40); posterior lateral episiotomy (AOR = 0.68 95 %; CI 0.50-0.94) or both anterior and posterior lateral episiotomies performed concurrently (AOR = 0.21 95 % CI 0.12-0.36) were all significantly less likely to have anal sphincter tears compared to women without episiotomies. Women with anterior episiotomy (AOR = 0.08; 95%CI 0.02-0.24), posterior lateral episiotomy (AOR = 0.17 95 %; CI 0.05-0.52) and the combination of the two (AOR = 0.04 95 % CI 0.01-0.11) were significantly less likely to have postpartum haemorrhage compared with women who had no episiotomy.

CONCLUSIONS: Among women living with FGM Type 3, episiotomies were protective against anal sphincter tears and postpartum haemorrhage. Further clinical and research is needed to guide clinical practice of when episiotomies should be performed.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

432 Somali women’s birth experiences in Canada after earlier female genital mutilation

Birth. 2000 Dec;27(4):227-34.
432 Somali women’s birth experiences in Canada after earlier female genital mutilation.
Chalmers B, Hashi KO
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Women with previous female genital mutilation (sometimes referred to as circumcision) are migrating, with increasing frequency, to countries where this practice is uncommon. Many health care professionals in these countries lack experience in assisting women with female genital mutilation during pregnancy and birth, and they are usually untrained in this aspect of care. Somali women who customarily practice the most extensive form of female mutilation, who were resident in Ontario and had recently given birth to a baby in Canada, were surveyed to explore their perceptions of perinatal care and their earlier genital mutilation experiences.
METHOD: Interviews of 432 Somali women with previous female genital mutilation, who had given birth to a baby in Canada in the past five years, were conducted at their homes by a Somali woman interviewer.
RESULTS: Findings suggested that women’s needs are not always adequately met during their pregnancy and birth care. Women reported unhappiness with both clinical practice and quality of care.
CONCLUSIONS: Changes in clinical obstetric practice are necessary to incorporate women’s perceptions and needs, to use fewer interventions, and to demonstrate greater sensitivity for cross-cultural practices and more respectful treatment than is currently available in the present system of care.

Female genital mutilation/cutting: an update

Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol2015;42(3):300-3.
Female genital mutilation/cutting: an update.
Rouzi AA, Alturki F.
ABSTRACT
Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a cultural practice involving several types of external female genitalia cutting. FGM/C is known to occur in all parts of the world but is most prevalent in 28 countries in Africa and the Middle East and among immigrant communities in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. Studies of FGM/C suffer from many methodological problems including inadequate analysis and an unclear reporting of results. The evidence to link FGM/C to infertility is weak. The management of epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts includes expensive investigations like comprehensive endocrinology tests and MRI resulting in unnecessary anxiety due to delay in surgical treatment. Similarly, unnecessary cesarean sections or rupture of the infibulation scar continue to occur because of the inadequate use of intrapartum defibulation. A significant amount of efforts is required to improve and correct the inadequate care of FGM/C women and girls.