Tag Archives: Parturition

The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.

Labor, delivery and postpartum complications in nulliparous women with female genital mutilation admitted to Karamara Hospital

FREEEthiop Med J. 2017 Jan;55(1):11-7.

Labor, delivery and postpartum complications in nulliparous women with female genital mutilation admitted to Karamara Hospital.

Gudu W, Abdulahi M.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess labor, delivery and postpartum complications in nulliparous women with FGM/C and evaluate the attitude of mothers towards elimination of FGM. Methods: A prospective hospital based study using structured questionnaire was conducted between January to March 2015 at Karamara hospital, Jijiga, Ethiopia. All nulliparous women admitted for labor and delivery were included. Data were collected regarding circumcision status, events of labor, delivery; postpartum and neonatal outcomes as well as attitude of mothers towards elimination of FGM/C. Results: Two hundred sixty four (92.0%) of the women had FGM/C with most (93.0%) undergoing Type III FGM. The mean age of the women was 22 yr. Failure to progress in 1st stage and prolonged 2nd stage of labor occurred in 165 (57.0%) and 189 (65.6%) of the cases respectively. Caesarean section was performed in 17.0% and instrumental delivery in 23.0%. 64.5% required episiotomies, 83.3% had an anterior episiotomy, 29 % had perineal tears, 25.7%% experienced post-partum hemorrhage and 24% postpartum infection. Among the newborns, there were 6.4% perinatal deaths; 18.8 % low birth weight and 1.5% birth injuries. Almost all complications were more frequently seen in circumcised compared to non-circumcised women. Conclusions: The prevalence of FGM is high and it substantially increases the risk of many maternal complications. Health professionals should be aware of these complications and support/care of women with FGM should be integrated at all levels of reproductive health care provision. Capacity building of responsible health professional should be initiated in the area with intensification of FGM eradication activities.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

[Genital female mutilation]. [Article in French]

Arch Pediatr. 2008 Jun;15(5):824.

[Genital female mutilation]. [Article in French]

Philippe HJ, Carton V, Lebihannic S, Bossis M, Jarrousse N, Rivet B.

UGOMPS, CHU Nantes, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. henri-jean.philippe@chu-nantes.fr <henri-jean.philippe@chu-nantes.fr>

No abstract is available for this article.

This article can be purchased in this LINK.

Correspondence: Episiotomy: a form of genital mutilation

Lancet. 1999 June;353(9168):1977 – 1978

Correspondence: Episiotomy: a form of genital mutilation

Marsden Wagner

Preview

In his ‘Sketches from The Lancet’ (April 24, p 1453) Peter Kandela describes how over 130 years ago The Lancet played a part in turning support away from one form of female genital mutilation in the UK—clitoridectomy. Hopefully, you can play a part in turning support away from another form of female genital mutilation which is widespread in the UK today—episiotomy.

After their review of scientific evidence, Thacker and Banta concluded that an episiotomy rate over 20% cannot be justified. On the basis of this and other evidence, WHO published the recommendation: “The systematic use of episiotomy is not justified. The protection of the perineum through alternative methods should be evaluated and adopted”. More recent research presents further evidence against frequent use of episiotomy…

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Care for Infibulated Women Giving Birth in Norway: An Anthropological Analysis of Health Workers’ Management of a Medically and Culturally Unfamiliar Issue

Med Anthropol Q. 2006 Dec; 20 (4): 516-544

Care for Infibulated Women Giving Birth in Norway: An Anthropological Analysis of Health Workers’ Management of a Medically and Culturally Unfamiliar Issue

Elise R, Johansen B

ABSTRACT

The focus of this article is on Norwegian health care workers’ experience and management of birth care of women who have undergone infibulation. Because infibulation is the most extensive form of female genital cutting, infibulated women experience a higher risk of birth complications, and health workers generally experience delivery care for this group as challenging. Infibulated women, who come from recently arrived immigrant groups, are a challenge to the predominant Norwegian birth philosophy of “natural childbirth” and the positive evaluation of everything considered natural. The challenges relate to a mixture of technical know-how and a complex set of interpretations of central cultural elements of gender, nature, health, and gender equity. The findings suggest that a combination of taboo, silence, limited knowledge, and emotional difficulty along with a wish to be culture sensitive may at times prove counterproductive to giving the best help. Health care workers often seem to impose “imagined” cultural values on infibulated women, rather than clarifying them through personal communication.

This article can be purchased in this LINK.