Tag Archives: Pediatrics

A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.

Female genital mutilation: what every paediatrician should know

Arch Dis Child. 2015 Mar 19. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2014-307234

Female genital mutilation: what every paediatrician should know

Creighton SM, Hodes D

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is almost always performed on children and consequently paediatricians should have a central role in the detection and prevention of FGM. FGM has no health benefits and can cause lifelong damage to physical and psychological health. Extensive migration of FGM practising communities means that FGM is now a global problem. Paediatricians worldwide need to be familiar with the identification and classification of FGM and its impact upon health as well as current trends in practice. However information about FGM is hampered by the secrecy surrounding the procedure and a lack of rigorous evidence based research. This review summarises what is currently known about the health aspects of FGM and how paediatricians should manage children with FGM in their clinical practice.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation in infants and young girls: report of sixty cases observed at the general hospital of abobo (abidjan, cote d’ivoire, west Africa).

Int J Pediatr. 2014;2014:837471. doi: 10.1155/2014/837471. Epub 2014 Mar 4.FREE

Female genital mutilation in infants and young girls: report of sixty cases observed at the general hospital of abobo (abidjan, cote d’ivoire, west Africa).

Plo K, Asse K, Seï D, Yenan J.

ABSTRACT

The practice of female genital mutilations continues to be recurrent in African communities despite the campaigns, fights, and laws to ban it. A survey was carried out in infants and young girls at the General Hospital of Abobo in Cote D’Ivoire. The purpose of the study was to describe the epidemiological aspects and clinical findings related to FGM in young patients. Four hundred nine (409) females aged from 1 to 12 years and their mothers entered the study after their consent. The results were that 60/409 patients (15%) were cut. The majority of the young females came from Muslim families (97%); the earlier age at FGM procedure in patients is less than 5 years: 87%. Amongst 409 mothers, 250 women underwent FGM which had other daughters cut. Women were mainly involved in the FGM and their motivations were virginity, chastity, body cleanliness, and fear of clitoris similar to penis. Only WHO types I and II were met. If there were no incidental events occurred at the time of the procedure, the obstetrical future of these young females would be compromised. With FGM being a harmful practice, health professionals and NGOs must unite their efforts in people education to abandon the procedure.

This paper can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation: a hidden epidemic (statement from the European Academy of Paediatrics).

Eur J Pediatr. 2013 Aug 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital mutilation: a hidden epidemic (statement from the European Academy of Paediatrics).

Sauer PJ, Neubauer D.

Beatrix Children Hospital/UMCG, PO BOX 30.001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands, p.j.j.sauer@umcg.nl.

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation or female circumcision is frequently performed worldwide. It is estimated by the World Health Organisation that worldwide, 100-140 million girls and women currently have to live with the consequences of female genital mutilation. The article argues that the tradition is one of the causes, while another four possible reasons for undergoing such cruel mutilation of young girls exist. Today, there exists a classification of at least four different ways of such mutilation which has no health benefits, and it harms girls and women in many ways. Long-term consequences like recurrent urinary tract infections, dysmenorrhea, sexual problems, infertility and complications both for the mother and infant at delivery are mentioned. Female genital mutilation is a violation of the fundamental human rights, as well as a savage breach of the integrity and personality. Conclusion: The European Academy of Paediatrics advises its members to initiate appropriate counselling for parents and female adolescents regarding the risk of female genital mutilation and strongly condemns female genital mutilation and councils its members not to perform such procedures.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

US paediatricians withdraw guidance on female genital cutting after criticisms.

BMJ. 2010 Jun 1;340:c2922. doi: 10.1136/bmj.c2922.

US paediatricians withdraw guidance on female genital cutting after criticisms.

Kmietowicz Z.

EXTRACT

The American Academy of Pediatrics has retracted its 2010 policy statement on female genital cutting after criticism and confirmed its opposition to all forms of mutilation, however minor.

Last month the UK Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health voiced concerns about the guidance, which suggested that doctors …

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Bewley et al.: Female Genital Mutilation

BMJ. 2010 Jun 2;340:c2728. doi: 10.1136/bmj.c2728.

Female genital mutilation.

Bewley S, Creighton S, Momoh C.

Comment in BMJ. 2010; 341: c3888. SEE

EXTRACT

Paediatricians should resist its medicalisation Female genital mutilation is defined by the World Health Organization as any procedure that involves partial or total removal of the external genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.1 Worldwide, 100-140 million girls and women are estimated to live with the consequences of such practices…

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Issues in Islamic Biomedical Ethics: A Primer for the Pediatrician

Pediatrics. Oct 1, 2001 (108)4, 965 -971 (doi: 10.1542/peds.108.4.965)

Issues in Islamic Biomedical Ethics: A Primer for the Pediatrician

Kamyar M. Hedayat and Roya Pirzadeh

ABSTRACT

The United States is becoming increasingly pluralistic. Pediatricians must become familiar with the factors that affect the emotional, physical, and spiritual health of their patients that are outside the ken of the traditionally dominant value system. Although many articles have addressed the cultural and ethnic factors, very few have considered the impact of religion. Islam, as the largest and fastest-growing religion in the world, has adherents throughout the world, including the United States, with 50% of US Muslims being indigenous converts. Islam presents a complete moral, ethical, and medical framework that, while it sometimes concurs, at times diverges or even conflicts with the US secular ethical framework. This article introduces the pediatrician to the Islamic principles of ethics within the field of pediatric care and child-rearing. It demonstrates how these principles may impact outpatient and inpatient care. Special attention is also given to adolescent and end-of-life issues.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Alan Scott: Letter to the Editor

Pediatrics. September 1, 2007 120(3) pp. 695 -696

Letter to the Editor

C. Alan Scott MD

EXTRACT

To the Editor.—

I fear that Dickerman may have lost sight of our responsibility as physicians: primum non nocere.1 His recent commentary2 advocating a change in the American Academy of Pediatrics policy on circumcision is ill-founded. His view that a decline in the prevalence of infant circumcision is “very disturbing” unfortunately shows how much more education infant advocacy groups need to perform to accomplish a ban on newborn male genital mutilation.

This letter can be accessed for free in this LINK

AAP: Female Genital Mutilation

Pediatrics1998; 102:1 153-156

Female Genital Mutilation

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS. Committee on Bioethics

ABSTRACT

The traditional custom of ritual cutting and alteration of the genitalia of female infants, girls, and adolescents, referred to as female genitalmutilation (FGM), persists primarily in Africa and among certain communities in the Middle East and Asia. Immigrants in the United States from areas where FGM is endemic may have daughters who have undergone a ritual genital procedure or may request that such a procedure be performed by a physician. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believes that pediatricians and pediatric surgical specialists should be aware that this practice has serious, life-threatening health risks for children and women. The AAP opposes all forms of FGM, counsels its members not to perform such ritual procedures, and encourages the development of community educational programs for immigrant populations.

This article can be accessed for free in this LINK

Ritual genital cutting of female minors.

Pediatrics. 2010 Jul;126(1):191. Epub 2010 Jun 7.

Ritual genital cutting of female minors.

American Academy of Pediatrics Board of Directors.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reaffirms its strong opposition to female genital cutting (FGC) and counsels its members not to perform such procedures. As typically practiced, FGC can be life-threatening. Little girls who escape death are still vulnerable to sterility, infection, and psychological trauma.

The AAP does not endorse the practice of offering a “clitoral nick.” This minimal pinprick is forbidden under federal law and the AAP does not recommend it to its members.

The AAP is steadfast in its goal of protecting all young girls from the harms of FGC….

This article can be accessed for free in this LINK