Tag Archives: Perinatal care

The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.

Midwifery training needs identified when caring for women with female genital mutilation

Evid Based Nurs. 2015 Aug 27. pii: ebnurs-2015-102080. doi: 10.1136/eb-2015-102080. [Epub ahead of print]

Midwifery training needs identified when caring for women with female genital mutilation.

Leye E

There is no abstract available for this article.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

FGM: dispelling the myths; exploring the facts

Pract Midwife. 2015 Jul-Aug;18(7):18-20.

FGM: dispelling the myths; exploring the facts.

Dixon-Wright R.

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation is a process that affects our practice. It is becoming more common in our ever-diversifying population and therefore education is vitally important to be able to put robust care plans in place. Understanding the psychological and physical difficulties experienced by women of childbearing age can help us to improve the care that we, as maternity healthcare professionals, can deliver. Looking at current research, this article examines some of the presumed cultural and societal beliefs behind the procedure and highlights some new evidence that change is welcomed by women and their families.

There is no LINK to view this article online.

Qualitative study of perinatal care experiences among Somali women and local health care professionals in Norway

European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology. 2004 Jan;112(1):29-35

Qualitative study of perinatal care experiences among Somali women and local health care professionals in Norway

Vangen S, Johansen REB, Sundby J, Træen B, Stray-Pedersen B

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore how perinatal care practice may influence labor outcomes among circumcised women. Study design: In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 Somali immigrants and 36 Norwegian health care professionals about their experiences from antenatal care, delivery and the management of circumcision. Results: Circumcision was not recognized as an important delivery issue among Norwegian health care professionals and generally the topic was not addressed antenatally. The Somalis feared lack of experience and sub-optimal treatment at delivery. All of the women expressed a strong fear of cesarean section. Health care professionals were uncertain about delivery procedures for infibulated women and occasionally cesarean sections were performed in place of defibulation. Conclusion: We hypothesize that neglect of circumcision may lead to adverse birth outcomes including unnecessary cesarean sections, prolonged second stage of labor and low Apgar scores. We suggest that infibulated women need a carefully planned delivery, correctly performed defibulation and adequate pain relief.

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