Tag Archives: Population surveillance

Female circumcision in Nigeria and attitudes towards its discontinuation

Afr J Med Med Sci. 2015 Dec;44(4):343-54.

Female circumcision in Nigeria and attitudes towards its discontinuation.

Gbadebo BM, Afolabi RF, Adebowale AS

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Female Circumcision (FC) is a harmful traditional practice and remains a public health problem particularly in the era of HIV/AIDS. Aside its numerous health implications, it can cause infertility, complications in childbirth and increased risk of newborn deaths. FC is widely practised in Nigeria. OBJECTIVE: The study assessed the level of FC, daughters’ circumcision and attitude towards discontinuation of the practice among women of reproductive age. METHODS: Data were extracted from the 2008 Nigeria Demographic Health and Survey. Data were analysed using Chi-square and binary logistic regression models (á = 0.05). RESULTS: Among the respondents, prevalence of FC was 49.2% with 30.6% having circumcised their daughters and 25.8% wishing the practice to continue. About 56% of circumcised women also circumcised their daughters whereas only 2.9% of uncircumcised women circumcised their daughters. Approximately 69.8% of women who had circumcised their daughters would like FC to continue compared to 8.8% of those who never circumcised any of their daughters. The likelihood of FC was higher (OR = 2.07; C.I = 1.85-2.30) among Moslems compare to Christians. Igbo women were less likely to discontinue FC compared to women of Hausa/Fulani ethnic group despite controlling for the confounding variables (OR = 0.57; C.I = 0.35-0.91). CONCLUSION: Female circumcision is still practiced in all parts of Nigeria and a high proportion of women reported that the practice should continue. There is need to intensify efforts on the campaign against female circumcision in Nigeria.

Social context of HIV infection in Uganda.

Health Transit Rev. 1995;5 Suppl:1-26.LME

Social context of HIV infection in Uganda.

Adeokun LA, Twa-Twa J, Ssekiboobo A, Nalwadda R.

Institute of Statistics and Applied Economics, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT

Some of the important policy and research implications of accumulating HIV/AIDS data are being ignored because of the attraction of social science research focused on the “multiple sexual mechanism’ of infection and transmission. Attention is drawn to the other policy and research issues relating to information on the timing of infection through a reanalysis of existing data on cumulative AIDS cases. The most urgent need is to supplement the mainstream research on risk groups with studies of the timing and circumstances of entry into sexual activity in the pre-teen years.

PIP:

Some of the important policy and research implications of HIV/AIDS data are being ignored because of the focus of social science research upon the multiple sexual mechanism of infection and transmission. Attention is drawn to the other policy and research issues relating to information on the timing of infection through a re-analysis of existing data on cumulative AIDS cases. However, the most urgent need is to supplement the mainstream research on risk groups with studies of the timing and circumstances of entry into sexual activity during the pre-teen years. The authors comment upon the social science response to the epidemic. This paper was written to help broaden the scope of discussion of the socioeconomic context of the rapid reproduction of infections and to focus upon the role of pre-teen girl-child sexuality in the dynamics of the epidemic.

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