Tag Archives: Prenatal Care

Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.

Midwifery training needs identified when caring for women with female genital mutilation

Evid Based Nurs. 2015 Aug 27. pii: ebnurs-2015-102080. doi: 10.1136/eb-2015-102080. [Epub ahead of print]

Midwifery training needs identified when caring for women with female genital mutilation.

Leye E

There is no abstract available for this article.

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Evidence to inform education, training and supportive work environments for midwives involved in the care of women with female genital mutilation: A review of global experience

Midwifery. 2014 Sep 6. pii: S0266-6138(14)00222-8. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2014.08.012. [Epub ahead of print]

Evidence to inform education, training and supportive work environments for midwives involved in the care of women with female genital mutilation: A review of global experience.

Dawson A, Turkmani S, Fray S, Nanayakkara S, Varol N, Homer C.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to identify how midwives in low and middle income countries (LMIC) and high income countries (HIC) care for women with female genital mutilation (FGM), their perceived challenges and what professional development and workplace strategies might better support midwives to provide appropriate quality care.

DESIGN: an integrative review involving a narrative synthesis of the literature was undertaken to include peer reviewed research literature published between 2004 and 2014.

FINDINGS: 10 papers were included in the review, two from LMIC and eight from HIC. A lack of technical knowledge and limited cultural competency was identified, as well as socio-cultural challenges in the abandonment process of the practice, particularly in LMIC settings. Training in the area of FGM was limited. One study reported the outcomes of an education initiative that was found to be beneficial.

KEY CONCLUSIONS: professional education and training, a working environment supported by guidelines and responsive policy and community education, are necessary to enable midwives to improve the care of women with FGM and advocate against the practice.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: improved opportunities for midwives to learn about FGM and receive advice and support, alongside opportunities for collaborative practice in contexts that enable the effective reporting of FGM to authorities, may be beneficial and require further investigation.

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Female genital mutilation among antenatal care and contraceptive advice attendees in Sweden.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(7):716-22.

Female genital mutilation among antenatal care and contraceptive advice attendees in Sweden.

Litorp H, Franck M, Almroth L.

Division of International Health/IHCAR, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. helena.litorp@vgregion.se

OBJECTIVE: To explore knowledge of, attitudes toward and practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) among women originally from countries where FGM is customary attending antenatal care and contraceptive advice in Sweden. METHODS: Women in reproductive age living in Sweden who originate from countries where FGM is practiced coming for antenatal care or contraceptive advice at two maternity welfare centers in Stockholm were asked to participate. Interview administered questionnaires and gynecological examination were used for data collection. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Out of 49 women asked, 40 women agreed to participate, of whom 37 had undergone FGM. Most FGM operations had been performed by doctors or midwives. Half of the Muslim women said FGM was allowed by their religion. All women reporting to have undergone ‘sunna’, an allegedly mild form, had extensive damage to their genitals. At gynecological examination three cases of reinfibulation were detected, of which two had been performed after delivery in Sweden. Twenty-nine women had daughters and three had let their daughters undergo FGM, all of them before settling in Sweden. Problems related to delivery and sexual intercourse were the most commonly mentioned complications of FGM. CONCLUSIONS: The reliability of the self-reported form of FGM is low, which may have implications for research, interventions and health care. Although many women express negative attitudes toward FGM and know about serious complications, the religious justifications, the practice of FGM on daughters, reinfibulation on adults and medicalization of the practice indicate attitudes that favor of the continued practice of FGM.

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