Tag Archives: Professional practice

The use of one’s knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.

Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel

Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2016 Jul;77(7):419-23. doi: 10.12968/hmed.2016.77.7.419.

Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel.

Cropp G, Armstrong J

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation is illegal. It is now mandatory for health-care professionals to report female genital mutilation to the police. Professionals caring for women and girls of all ages must understand how female genital mutilation presents, and what action to take.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Uncertain future for initiative against FGM in the UK

Lancet. 2016 Jul 23;388(10042):326. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31147-3.

Uncertain future for initiative against FGM in the UK

Devi S

SUMMARY

Activists say that a community-based programme to tackle female genital mutilation in the UK needs support from central or local government to continue. Sharmila Devi reports.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Health professionals worldwide lack knowledge on female genital mutilation

BMJ. 2015;351:h6693

Health professionals worldwide lack knowledge on female genital mutilation

Kmietowicz Z

EXTRACT

More training and guidance on treating women and girls who have had female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C) are needed for health professionals around the world, a review has concluded.

Researchers from Sydney, Australia, conducted a systematic review to assess health professionals’ experience of FGM/C in their clinical setting, their knowledge of FGM/C types, complications of the practice, and their access to education and training.

They found 159 research papers, but the standard was generally poor. Only 18 studies met their inclusion criteria, and none met all eight quality criteria. …

This article can be accessed in this LINK

 

Female genital mutilation: The abuse has to stop

Midwifery, 2014, 30, 277–278. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2014.02.001

Female genital mutilation: The abuse has to stop

Bick D

ABSTRACT

Female genital mutilation (FGM) involves the partial or total removal of the female external genitalia or injury of the genitalia with no medical indication or resulting health benefit (World Health Organisation, 2008). It is a custom prevalent in sub-Saharan countries of Africa, with some countries including Egypt, the Sudan and Somalia estimated to have a FGM prevalence of around 90% (United Nations Children׳s Fund, 2013). More midwives and other health professionals in the UK and elsewhere are providing care and support for women who have sustained FGM as a consequence of increased migration from countries where FGM is practiced.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation: Knowledge, attitude and practices of Flemish midwives

Midwifery. 2014 Dec 8. pii: S0266-6138(14)00294-0. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2014.11.012. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital mutilation: Knowledge, attitude and practices of Flemish midwives.

Cappon S, L’Ecluse C, Clays E, Tency I, Leye E

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: health professionals in Belgium are confronted with female genital mutilation (FGM). To date, no survey to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices on FGM was conducted among midwives in the Northern region of Belgium. OBJECTIVE: the objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practices of Flemish midwives regarding female genital mutilation (FGM). DESIGN: we used a quantitative design, using KAP study (semi-structured questionnaire). SETTING: labour wards, maternity wards and maternal intensive care units (MIC) in 56 hospitals in Flemish region of Belgium. PARTICIPANTS: 820 midwives, actively working in labour wards, maternity wards and maternal intensive care units (MIC). FINDINGS: 820 valid questionnaires (40.9%) were returned. More than 15% of the respondents were recently confronted with FGM. They were mostly faced with the psychological and sexual complications caused by FGM. Few respondents were aware of existing guidelines regarding FGM in their hospitals (3.5%). The results also showed that only 20.2% was aware of the exact content of the law. The majority of midwives condemned the harmful traditional practice: FGM was experienced as a form of violence against women or a violation of human rights. Only 25.9% declared that FGM forms a part of their midwifery program. The vast majority of respondents (92.5%) indicated a need for more information on the subject. KEY CONCLUSIONS: this study indicated that midwives in Flanders are confronted with FGM and its complications and highlighted the gaps in the knowledge of Flemish midwives regarding FGM. This may interfere with the provision of adequate care and prevention of FGM for the new-born daughter. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: there is an important need for appropriate training of (student)midwives concerning FGM as well as for the development and dissemination of clear guidelines in Flemish hospitals.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Doctor who offered to arrange female genital mutilation is struck off.

BMJ. 2014 Jun 1;348:g3665. doi: 10.1136/bmj.g3665.

Doctor who offered to arrange female genital mutilation is struck off.

Dyer C.

EXTRACT

A general practitioner who was secretly recorded offering to help arrange female genital mutilation (FGM) for two young girls has been struck off the UK medical register. Ali Mao-Aweys, who was born and raised in Somalia, was caught giving advice to a newspaper reporter who had posed as an aunt who wanted to arrange the procedure for her nieces, aged 10 and 13.

The Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service in Manchester found that he had offered to assist in arranging an operation in the United Kingdom, knowing that it was illegal, and that he had provided the telephone number …

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Type I Female Genital Mutilation: A Cause of Completely Closed Vagina

J Sex Med. 2014 May 30. doi: 10.1111/jsm.12605. [Epub ahead of print]

Type I Female Genital Mutilation: A Cause of Completely Closed Vagina.

Rouzi AA, Sahly N, Alhachim E, Abduljabbar H.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Female genital mutilation (FGM) ranges in severity from a nick of the clitoris to partial or total removal of the external genitalia. Sexual complications after FGM include sexual dysfunction, difficult intercourse, and dyspareunia. AIM: We report a case of Type I FGM presenting as complete vaginal closure and urinary retention.

METHODS: A 16-year-old adolescent was referred for obliterated vagina and urinary retention. She had recurrent urinary tract infections, difficulty in voiding, and cyclic hematuria. At the age of 1 year she had been taken by her mother to a pediatric surgeon to have a Type I FGM procedure. On examination, the urethral meatus and vaginal orifices were completely closed by the FGM scar. She underwent uneventful surgical opening of the vagina.

RESULTS: A normal vaginal orifice was created and normal flow of urine and menses occurred.

CONCLUSION: Type I FGM can present as complete vaginal closure and urinary retention. Proper diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

London GP is cleared of practising female genital mutilation

BMJ. 2014 Apr 15;348:g2807. doi: 10.1136/bmj.g2807.

London GP is cleared of practising female genital mutilation.

Dyer C.

EXTRACT

A London GP who removed almost all of the labia minora of a patient during cosmetic surgery has been cleared of practising female genital mutilation by the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service.

Sureshkumar Pandya performed labiaplasty in March 2012 on a 33 year old woman named only as Patient A, who complained that her labia were “ugly” and made her uncomfortable. He saw her again a week later and recorded that the wound was healing well.

But a week after that, Patient A went to see another GP, who recorded in her notes: “Patient upset …

This letter can be purchased in this LINK

Health care for immigrant women in Italy: are we really ready? A survey on knowledge about female genital mutilation.

Ann Ist Super Sanita. 2014;50(1):49-53.DOI: 10.4415/ANN_14_01_08.FREE

Health care for immigrant women in Italy: are we really ready? A survey on knowledge about female genital mutilation.

Caroppo E, Almadori A, Giannuzzi V, Brogna P, Diodati A, Bria P.

ABSTRACT

Background. Because of immigration, female genital mutilation (FGM) is an issue of increasing concern in western countries. Nevertheless operators without a specific training may ignore the health condition of women subjected to this practice and fail to provide them adequate assistance. The purpose of the study was to estimate the current knowledge about FGM among social and health care assistants working with asylum seeker.

Material and methods. From October to December 2012, a questionnaire was used to interview 41 operators working in CARA (Shelter for Refugees and Asylum Seekers) in central and southern Italy.

Results. Only 7.3% of respondents states to know well FGM, while 4.9% do not know it at all. 70.7% declare to have never met or assisted a woman with FGM, nevertheless all respondents work with asylum seeker from countries where FGM are performed.

Conclusions. Migration fluxes to Italy over the past decade created a healthcare challenge: women with FGM have specific medical and psychological problems that doctors, nurses and social assistants without specific training are not usually able to manage.

This article can be accessed for free in this LINK

Knowledge of health personnel about female genital mutilation

Acta méd. costarric vol.50 no.4 San José dic. 2008FREE

Knowledge of health personnel about female genital mutilation (Letter in Spanish)

Cambronero-Aguilar I, Campos-Cortés C, Chavarría-Bolaños R, Chavarría-Ulate D, Gamboa- Ramón K, Loría- Chavarría G, Sandí Grettchen F

ABSTRACT

Background and aim: Nowadays, the short and long-term consequences in psychological, sexual, social and medical areas of female genital mutilation are known. It is a common practice in non occidental countries. However because of globalization and migration it has been a problem in different countries. In this context it is very important that the medical and nursing professionals have knowledge about its medical complications and management. The present study was undertaken to determine the knowledge of medical doctors and nurses regarding female genital mutilation, its possible medical consequences and its clinical management. Materials and method: A survey was made to 70 medical doctors and 30 nurses, at 4 national hospitals of the Costa Rican social security system, between October and November 2006. Result: 81% know about female genital mutilation, however 63% do not know about its obstetric complications and 97% said they did not know the deinfibulation method, 60% of the medical doctors do not know how to manage a case. Discussion: The result is explained because this is not a common diagnosis in this country. Nevertheless, the documentation of a case in Costa Rica and the continued migration of these populations justify the need of more information and knowledge about management of these patients. It is relevant the role of continue medical education.