Tag Archives: Sexual counselling

Delivering culturally sensitive, sexual health education in western Kenya: a phenomenological case study.

Afr J AIDS Res. 2017 Sep;16(3):193-202. doi: 10.2989/16085906.2017.1349682.

Delivering culturally sensitive, sexual health education in western Kenya: a phenomenological case study.

Lacey G

ABSTRACT

While generic programmes have been created to raise sexual health awareness, these cannot always be applied to communities whose cultures and circumstances make them especially vulnerable to infection. Taking a phenomenological approach, this paper examines the circumstances of the Gusii people of Kisii, Kenya, and examines the specific challenges of providing sexual health education to the community as experienced by an ethnic Gusii woman, Joyce Ombasa. Joyce’s story reveals that the Gusii living in and around rural villages have several cultural characteristics that make them susceptible to HIV/AIDS and that render community health education problematic, especially if offered by a female educator of the same ethnicity. Women cannot teach men. Discussions of sex and condom use, and viewing the naked bodies of the opposite sex are taboo. Promiscuity is commonplace and there is a reluctance to use condoms and to undergo HIV testing. Female circumcision persists and there is a high rate of sexual violence, incest and intergenerational sexual intercourse. In addition, government policies and legislation threaten to exacerbate some of the sexually risky behaviours. Bringing HIV education and female empowerment to the rural Gusii requires a culturally sensitive approach, discarding sexual abstinence messages in favour of harm minimisation, including the promotion of condom use, regular HIV testing and the rejection of female circumcision and intergenerational sex. Trust needs to be built through tactics such as adopting a complex and fluid outsider identity and replacing formal sex education with training in income generating skills and casual discussions regarding condoms and sexual health.

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Sexual counselling for treating or preventing sexual dysfunction in women living with female genital mutilation: A systematic review.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2017 Feb;136 Suppl 1:38-42. doi: 10.1002/ijgo.12049. Sexual counselling for treating or preventing sexual dysfunction in women living with female genital mutilation: A systematic review. 

Okomo U, Ogugbue M, Inyang E, Meremikwu MM.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Female sexual dysfunction is the persistent or recurring decrease in sexual desire or arousal, the difficulty or inability to achieve an orgasm, and/or the feeling of pain during sexual intercourse. Impaired sexual function can occur with all types of female genital mutilation (FGM) owing to the structural changes, pain, or traumatic memories associated with the procedure. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized studies into the effects of sexual counseling with or without genital lubricants on the sexual function of women living with FGM. SEARCH STRATEGY: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, African Index Medicus, SCOPUS, LILACS, CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, and other databases were searched to August 2015. The reference lists of retrieved studies were checked for reports of additional studies, and lead authors contacted for additional data. SELECTION CRITERIA: Studies of girls and women living with any type of FGM who received counselling interventions for sexual dysfunction were included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: No relevant studies that addressed the objective of the review were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a comprehensive search, the authors could not find evidence of the effects of sexual counseling on the sexual function of women living with FGM. Studies assessing this intervention are needed.

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