Tag Archives: Spain

Protocolo para la prevención y actuación ante la mutilación genital femenina en Aragón [Text in Spanish]

aragonGovernment of Aragon, Instituto Aragonés de la Mujer, Medicos del Mundo.

Protocolo para la prevención y actuación ante la mutilación genital femenina en Aragón [Text in Spanish]

This guideline has been prepared with the aim to support healthcare, social and education workers to prevent and respond to the needs of girls and women who undergo FGM in Aragon (Spain).

[The voice of women subjected to female genital mutilation in the Region of Murcia (Spain).] [Article in Spanish]

Gac Sanit. 2014 Mar 24. pii: S0213-9111(14)00047-8. doi: 10.1016/j.gaceta.2014.02.006. [Epub ahead of print]

[The voice of women subjected to female genital mutilation in the Region of Murcia (Spain).] [Article in Spanish]

Ballesteros Meseguer C, Almansa Martínez P, Pastor Bravo MD, Jiménez Ruiz I.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the perceptions of a group of women who underwent female genital mutilation on the impact of this practice on their sexual and reproductive health.

METHODS: We performed a phenomenological qualitative study in a sample of 9 sub-Saharan Africa women, whose mean age was 30 years old and who had lived in Spain for 1 to 14 years. These women underwent genital mutilation in their countries of origin. Data was collected using a socio-demographic survey and an in-depth, structured personal interview. Subsequently, we performed a thematic discourse analysis.

RESULTS: The discourses were grouped into four categories related to participants’ perceptions of female genital mutilation. These categories were intimate relationships, pregnancy, childbirth, and social impact.

CONCLUSIONS: The practice of female genital mutilation is maintained due to social and family pressure, transmitted from generation to generation and silenced by women themselves. This practice affects their sexual and reproductive health, as demonstrated by anorgasmia and dyspareunia. The women were satisfied with the healthcare received during pregnancy and childbirth. Nevertheless, most of them were not satisfied with family planning.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation. Review and aspects of medico-legal interests.

Cuad. med. forense v.16 n.3 Sevilla jul.-sep. 2010 FREE

 

Female genital mutilation. Review and aspects of medico-legal interests. (Article in Spanish)

Gallego MA, López MI

ABSTRACT

The gradual arrival in Spain of people from sub-Saharan Africa, has highlighted the practice of a series of ancient rituals in girls, harmful to their health, and which are encompassed within the concept of Female Genital Mutilation in accordance with the WHO definition. In our country these acts are classified as a crime of injury. Therefore they are likely to raise legal medical evaluations. We consider it particularly important knowledge of these practices on the part of professionals in the forensic medicine.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

[Las mutilaciones genitales femeninas: reflexiones para una intervención desde la atención primaria]

Aten Primaria. 2006;38(2):122-6

[Las mutilaciones genitales femeninas: reflexiones para una intervención desde la atención primaria] [Article in Spanish]

Kaplan Marcusan A, Torán Monserrat P, Bedoya Muriel MH, Bermúdez Anderson K, Moreno Navarro J, and Bolíbar Ribas B.

EXTRACT

En los últimos 20 años, España se ha convertido en punto de destino de movimientos migratorios de personas procedentes de diversos países del África subsahariana. No emigran los continentes ni los colores, sino las personas y sus culturas. Para los profesionales de la salud, esto ha supuesto descubrir realidades culturales diferentes y afrontar nuevos retos asistenciales1,2, en el marco de complejos procesos de aculturación e integración social.  En 28 países africanos, la realización de mutilaciones genitales femeninas (MGF) es una práctica habitual, en el contexto cultural de los ritos de paso a la edad adulta y como elemento de socialización de las niñas. Existe un entramado de creencias culturales, tradiciones y gerontocracias que perpetúa estas intervenciones contra la integridad física de las mujeres…

This article can be accessed for free in this LINK

FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION IN SPAIN: POSSIBILITIES OF PREVENTION IN THE AREAS OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SERVICES

Migraciones. 2006, 19, 189-217FREE

[Female genital mutilation in Spain: Possibilities of prevention in the areas of primary health care, education and social services] [Article in Spanish]

Kaplan A, Torán P, Bermúdez K and Castany MJ

EXTRACT

… En muchos países del África subsahariana la realización de mutilaciones genitales femeninas (MGF) es una práctica habitual, en el contexto cultural de los ritos de paso de la infancia a la edad adulta y como elemento de socialización de las niñas. Existe todo un entramado de creencias culturales, tradiciones y gerontocracias que perpetúan estas intervenciones contra la integridad física de las mujeres (Ahmadu, 2000; Hellsten, 2004).  A la práctica de las MGF se asocian complicaciones físicas y psicológicas con un fuerte impacto sobre la salud y el bienestar de las mujeres (Craft, 1997; Dorkenoo, 1995; Morison, 2001; El-Defrawi, 2001). La incorporación a nuestra sociedad de familias procedentes de entornos geográficos, históricos, sociales y culturales diversos, donde la realización de MGF tiene un fuerte arraigo identitario…

This text can be accessed for free in this LINK

Els professionals sanitaris davant la mutilació genital femenina

Revista Primarics. Barcelona. 2002, 14: 14-15.FREE

[Els professionals sanitaris davant la mutilació genital femenina] [Article in Catalan]

Moreno, J, Castany MJ

There is no abstract available for this article.

This article can be accessed for free in this LINK

News: Spain considers improving law on female circumcision

Lancet. 2001 may;357(9267):1510

News: Spain considers improving law on female circumcision

Bosch X

Preview

A regional court in Spain launched an inquiry on May 2 into six cases of illegal circumcision of immigrant African girls, amid calls for harsher penalties for practitioners of the operation and immigrant parents who force their children to endure the barbaric procedure.

On May 4, the Official Medical College of Barcelona asked doctors to notify the judge of any suspected cases of genital mutilation so that children could be protected. “This practice cannot be justified with the argument that it’s a cultural rite to be respected”, said the college.

Paediatricians from two hospitals in Zaragoza, the capital of the Aragón region, discovered the mutilations and suspected that at least one of the operations was done very recently in Spain. The Zaragoza city council immediately filed a lawsuit that called the practice a “crime and a violation of human rights”…

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital mutilation: perceptions of healthcare professionals and the perspective of the migrant families.

BMC Public Health. 2010 Apr 13;10:193.

Female genital mutilation: perceptions of healthcare professionals and the perspective of the migrant families.

Kaplan-Marcusán A, Del Rio NF, Moreno-Navarro J, Castany-Fàbregas MJ, Nogueras MR, Muñoz-Ortiz L, Monguí-Avila E, Torán-Monserrat P.

Primary Healthcare Centre Mataró 6 (Gatassa), Catalan Health Institute, Camí del Mig 36, 08303 Mataró, Barcelon, Spain.

BACKGROUND: Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a traditional practice which is harmful to health and is profoundly rooted in many Sub-Saharan African countries. It is estimated that between 100 and 140 million women around the world have been victims of some form of FGM and that each year 3 million girls are at risk of being submitted to these practices. As a consequence of the migratory phenomena, the problems associated with FGM have extended to the Western countries receiving the immigrants. The practice of FGM has repercussions on the physical, psychic, sexual and reproductive health of women, severely deteriorating their current and future quality of life. Primary healthcare professionals are in a privileged position to detect and prevent these situations of risk which will be increasingly more present in Spain.

METHODS/DESIGN: The objective of the study is to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of the primary healthcare professionals, working in 25 health care centres in Barcelona and Girona regions, regarding FGM, as well as to investigate the perception of this subject among the migrant communities from countries with strong roots in these practices. A transversal descriptive study will be performed with a questionnaire to primary healthcare professionals and migrant healthcare users.Using a questionnaire specifically designed for this study, we will evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and skills of the healthcare professionals to approach this problem. In a sub-study, performed with a similar methodology but with the participation of cultural mediators, the perceptions of the migrant families in relation to their position and expectancies in view of the result of preventive interventions will be determined.Variables related to the socio-demographic aspects, knowledge of FGM (types, cultural origin, geographic distribution and ethnicity), evaluation of attitudes and beliefs towards FGM and previous contact or experience with cases or risk situations will be obtained.

DISCUSSION: Knowledge of these harmful practices and a preventive approach from a transcultural perspective may represent a positive intervention model for integrative care of immigrants, respecting their values and culture while also being effective in eliminating the physical and psychic consequences of FGM.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Perception of primary health professionals about female genital mutilation: from healthcare to intercultural competence.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2009 Jan 15;9:11.

Perception of primary health professionals about female genital mutilation: from healthcare to intercultural competence.

Kaplan-Marcusan A, Torán-Monserrat P, Moreno-Navarro J, Castany Fàbregas MJ, Muñoz-Ortiz L.

Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain. adriana.kaplan@uab.cat

BACKGROUND: The practice of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), a deeply-rooted tradition in 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, carries important negative consequences for the health and quality of life of women and children. Migratory movements have brought this harmful traditional practice to our medical offices, with the subsequent conflicts related to how to approach this healthcare problem, involving not only a purely healthcare-related event but also questions of an ethical, cultural identity and human rights nature.

METHODS: The aim of this study was to analyse the perceptions, degree of knowledge, attitudes and practices of the primary healthcare professionals in relation to FGM. A transversal, descriptive study was performed with a self-administered questionnaire to family physicians, paediatricians, nurses, midwives and gynaecologists. Trends towards changes in the two periods studied (2001 and 2004) were analysed.

RESULTS: A total of 225 (80%) professionals answered the questionnaire in 2001 and 184 (62%) in 2004. Sixteen percent declared detection of some case in 2004, rising three-fold from the number reported in 2001. Eighteen percent stated that they had no interest in FGM. Less than 40% correctly identified the typology, while less than 30% knew the countries in which the practice is carried out and 82% normally attended patients from these countries.

CONCLUSION: Female genital mutilations are present in primary healthcare medical offices with paediatricians and gynaecologists having the closest contact with the problem. Preventive measures should be designed as should sensitization to promote stands against these practices.

This article can be accessed in this LINK