Tag Archives: Urogenital Systems

All the organs involved in reproduction and the formation and release of URINE. It includes the kidneys, ureters, BLADDER; URETHRA, and the organs of reproduction – ovaries, UTERUS; FALLOPIAN TUBES; VAGINA; and CLITORIS in women and the testes; SEMINAL VESICLES; PROSTATE; seminal ducts; and PENIS in men.

Are obstetric outcomes affected by female genital mutilation?

Int Urogynecol J. 2017 Sep 9. doi: 10.1007/s00192-017-3466-5. [Epub ahead of
print]

Are obstetric outcomes affected by female genital mutilation?

Balachandran AA, Duvalla S, Sultan AH, Thakar R

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Female genital mutilation (FGM) has been associated with adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes, such as postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), perineal trauma, genital fistulae, obstructed labour and stillbirth. The prevalence of FGM has increased in the UK over the last decade. There are currently no studies available that have explored the obstetric impact of FGM in the UK. The aim of our study was to investigate the obstetric and neonatal outcomes of women with FGM when compared with the general population. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective case-control study of consecutive pregnant women with FGM over a 5-year period between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Each woman with FGM was matched for age, ethnicity, parity and gestation with subsequent patients without FGM (control cohort) over the same 5-year period. Outcomes assessed were mode of delivery, duration of labour, estimated blood loss, analgaesia, perineal trauma and foetal outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 242 eligible women (121 FGM, 121 control) were identified for the study. There was a significant increase in the use of episiotomy in the FGM group (p = 0.009) and a significant increase in minor PPH in the control group during caesarean sections (p = 0.0001). There were no differences in all other obstetric and neonatal parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In our unit, FGM was not associated with an increased incidence of adverse obstetric and foetal morbidity or mortality.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Medical complications of female genital mutilation

Journal of American College Health. 2001, 49(6):275-280.

Medical complications of female genital mutilation

Epstein D, Graham P, & Rimsza M

ABSTRACT

More than 130 million women are subjected to genital mutilation. Despite increasing efforts to reduce the practice, there are many obstacles to eliminating this 2,000-year-old practice, which is based on strong cultural traditions. As college health clinicians provide care to more international students from countries where female genital mutilation is performed, increased awareness and knowledge of the procedure will enable clinicians to understand and manage its complications. We report a case of obstructive uropathy resulting in hydronephrosis secondary to female genital mutilation and review the medical literature regarding this and other complications of genital mutilation “surgery.”

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Overactive bladder after female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) type III.

BMJ Case Rep. 2013 Oct 4;2013. pii: bcr2012008155. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2012-008155.

Overactive bladder after female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) type III.

Abdulcadir J, Dällenbach P.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

A 27-year-old Somali woman with type III a-b female genital mutilation/cutting, consulted because of slow micturition, voiding efforts, urgency and urge incontinence (overactive bladder). She also referred primary dysmenorrhoea and superficial dyspareunia making complete sexual intercourses impossible. We treated her by defibulation and biofeedback re-educative therapy. We also offered a multidisciplinary counselling. At 5 months follow-up, urgency and urge incontinence had resolved and she became pregnant.

This article can be accessed in this LINK

Female genital circumcision/mutilation: implications for female urogynaecological health.

Int Urogynecol J. 2013 Jul 16. [Epub ahead of print]

Female genital circumcision/mutilation: implications for female urogynaecological health.

Teufel K, Dörfler DM.

Hospital of St. Poelten, St. Poelten, Austria, katharinateufel@gmx.at.

ABSTRACT

“Female genital circumcision” or “female genital mutilation”, as it is called more often, is an operation that is primarily carried out in Africa. Owing to migration, physicians are increasingly confronted with this issue in Western countries as well. A range of negative effects may result from this operation and this article aims to address consequences for female pelvic health. Special emphasis is placed on urogynaecological health consequences; in particular, on “voiding difficulties”, “recurrent urinary tract infections” and “vesicovaginal fistula”. All of these occur mostly in infibulated women, i.e. in women whose genitalia are sealed by the most severe form of circumcision. Some of the problems that may emerge as a result of the operation can be resolved by defibulation (i.e. surgical reopening of the sealed vulva). Female genital circumcision is a sensitive topic even in the area of research and reliable data are therefore scarce.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Incomplete bladder emptying due to labial fusion in a pubertal girl: A delayed consequence of female circumcision

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. August 2004 44(4) 372–373

Incomplete bladder emptying due to labial fusion in a pubertal girl: A delayed consequence of female circumcision

Nor Azlina bt. AWANG, Claire VIEGAS, Osborn A. C. VIEGAS

ABSTRACT

No abstract is available for this article.

This article can be purchased in this LINK

Urogenital complications among girls with genital mutilation: a hospital-based study in Khartoum.

Afr J Reprod Health. 2005 Aug;9(2):118-24.

Urogenital complications among girls with genital mutilation: a hospital-based study in Khartoum.

Almroth L, Bedri H, El Musharaf S, Satti A, Idris T, Hashim MS, Suliman GI, Bergström S.

Division of International Health, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17676 Stockholm, Sweden. L.Almroth@telia.com

Abstract

To explore paediatric complications of female genital mutilation (FGM), 255 consecutive girls aged 4-9 years presenting to an emergency ward in Sudan were included in this clinical study. Full examination, including inspection of genitalia, was performed. Dipsticks for nitrite and leucocytes were used to diagnose suspected urinary tract infection (UTI). Girls with a form of FGM narrowing vulva had significantly more UTI than others, and among girls below the age of seven there was a significant association between FGM and UTI. Only 8% of girls diagnosed as having UTI reported urogenital symptoms. In spite of the fact that 73% of the girls subjected to FGM were reported to have been bedridden for one week or more after the operation, only 10% stated immediate complications. We conclude that FGM contributes significantly to morbidity among girls, a large share of which does not come to medical attention.

This article can be purchased in this LINK